Episode 55 - Jean Paul Ballard

October 02, 2019 22 min read

Episode 55 - Jean Paul Ballard

  

 

In Episode 55 of the All Torque Podcast, I interview Jean-Paul Ballard, the CEO and Co-Founder of Swiss Side Wheels. Before working full time for Swiss Side in 2014, he worked as a lead engineer in Formula 1 motor racing teams for 14 years.

Swiss Side is the leading aerodynamic specialist in the cycling industry. They push the boundaries of aerodynamics design, construction and materials to bring cycling wheels into a new era. The company was founded in 2012 and really kicked off in 2014 with the first Aero Hadrons 625 Aero Wheel. Jean-Paul leads the company together with Dr. Seamus Mullarkey, former Head of Aerodynamics from the Sauber, now Alfa Romeo F1 Team for 20 years.

In this episode we cover:

  • The interesting story of how Jean Paul started Swiss Side.
  • Balancing his career at F1 while pursuing his interest for cycling.
  • His work with individual athletes and teams in Swiss Side’s support arm.
  • The tests and measurements they take and make that helps improve athlete performance and allows them to find the best set-ups and equipment for their specific needs.
  • Jean Paul shares how their data has helped them and gives us an example of what they have changed and improved as a result.
  • Using the best equipment for each athlete depending on the race conditions.
  • Jean Paul discusses aerodynamics versus weight.
  • Tips for athletes, in particular cyclists, triathletes in improving their performance.
  • Jean Paul shares a funny story with us.

Links

Transcript:

FELICITY:

Welcome to the All Torque podcast, where each episode we interview an inspiring person to share their story with you. I'm your host, Felicity Dales, managing director of Body Torque. 

I have here today Jean-Paul Ballard, an Australian-Swiss brought up mainly in Sydney but also Lausanne, Switzerland, the CEO and Co-Founder of Swiss Side Wheels, the number one in aerodynamics - the aerodynamic revolution in cycling. Jean-Paul spent 14 years as a lead engineer in Formula 1 motor racing teams as a Head of Concept Design for the complete F1 car project at the Sauber F1 team. Jean-Paul re-directed his career in 2014 to dedicate himself full time to his young company and brand, Swiss Side.

After completing your Aeronautical Engineering Degree at Sydney University, Jean-Paul moved to Europe to pursue his passion for motorsport that led to a 14-year long career in the world of Formula 1 in various teams, being the Head of the Complete F1 Car Concept at the Sauber F1 Team. 

Jean-Paul began as a driver in motorsport in his teams and was competing in various sports car classes in Australia when he was at university. Fitness ranger and skyracing became very important and this led to Jean-Paul taking up cycling and finding his love for the sport.

During his career in Formula (F1), Jean-Paul was regularly competing in cycling and triathlon across Europe and this ultimately led him to founding Swiss Side and changing career direction in 2014 to dedicating himself full time to this project. 

Swiss Side was founded in 2012 and really kicked off in 2014 with the first Aero Hadrons 625 Aero Wheel; Swiss Side, the leading aerodynamic specialist in the cycling industry. Your spin-off from Formula 1 and transferred the previously secret methods for Aerodynamic development from F1 to cycling. This allows you to make massive steps in performance on cycling equipment and athletes, too. Together with you, leading the company, is the former Head of Aerodynamics from the Sauber, now, Alfa Romeo F1 Team, Dr. Seamus Mullarkey who had that position for 20 years at Sauber is equally passionate about cycling and improving performance. 

“We push the boundaries of aerodynamics design, construction and materials to bring cycling wheels into a new era.”

Welcome, Jean-Paul.

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes. Thanks, Felicity. Glad to be here.

FELICITY:

Lovely to have you. Tell us about how did you come about starting Swiss Side from starting out in Formula 1 and translating what you learned into cycling? Was that idea formulated whilst at riding one day?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes. Funnily enough, you’ve answered that question. Yes. What actually happened is me and a bunch of my mates at the Sauber F1 team, we were big cycling fans and we had our own cycling club. And I just invested in a really expensive set a full carbon, top-level aero wheels; that was in 2009. And we took them out riding and on the first ride out; we had a local mountain pass right near the Sauber team in Zurich. And we went straight up this mountain pass and on the first descent, the wheels completely delaminated due to breaking, overheating. And I was absolutely furious because I'd spent; it was $2,500 US dollars on that set of wheels.

FELICITY:

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

And one of the guys we were riding was the head of Composite Designs or the head of the Carbon Fibre Design of the company and I was really angry and he was like, “Well, JP, don’t get angry. We should do this ourselves.” And I said, “Yes, you’re right. We can do this better. We’ve got all the know-how.” And it soon it started more as a bit of a sort of a joke, a bit of a jive but that actually sort of plan to deceive and led to us actually doing it. 

FELICITY:

Amazing. So did you balance your cycling with; was that like released for you working for the F1 team? Was that something that you did regularly?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yeah. Absolutely. And actually, what’s really cool about working in Switzerland is there’s a very strict working culture and there’s a one and a half hour lunch break. And so, the company shut down for one and a half hours at lunchtime, and traditionally, that was because people go home and have lunch at home and the kids go home at school. And so, people go home as families but of course, when you’re a single bloke, having your lunch break in Switzerland, you jump on your bike. 

FELICITY:

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

So we were literally doing one, one and a half hour rides every lunchtime and then doing massive tours in the weekend. So it was definitely, of course, like a big hobby and passion but definitely a really good stress balancing act for the high-intensity world of F1.

FELICITY:

Fantastic and it sounds like a great balance as well because we don't do that here in Australia. So to have that break in the middle of the day reminds me of the Italians having siestas.

JEAN-PAUL:

For sure:

FELICITY:

Yes. It’s a good cultural thing to adopt, isn’t it?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, definitely.

FELICITY:

You did a presentation to Google in July where you mentioned the time for any course for any set up can be simulated with high accuracy and most important parameters for performance can be understood, the best set up for optimum performance can be determined. Let's talk about that.

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes. So, at Swiss Side, we don’t just do our wheels. We also do, we have a big consulting arm to our business and one of our most high-profile clients is Team INEOS and we do all the performance simulation and a lot of aerodynamics work for them. And basically, this performance simulation, you can model anything. And again, coming from our Formula 1 background, the whole performance simulation of the car had you simulate the next race to come up with the best aerodynamic package, the best weight distribution, the best suspension package, you can simulate all that with some highly powerful computer programs. 

Now, we do exactly the same thing in cycling. And now, there are some simple online platforms already available like Best Bike Split, for example, is maybe one that people have heard off. And what we’ve basically done is we’ve built like a best bike split on steroids, which we use for simulating what is the best setup. And most importantly, because we do so much work designing bikes, designing wheels, designing clothing even for other brands, it’s really important to put it in perspective where can you win the most time? Where can you save the most time? There’s no point in us investing a large proportion of our time on the part of the bike and rider system that’s only going to deliver a small proportion of the time saving. 

And so, this performance simulation tool allows us to identify where the most potential is and what we basically do is you input all of the parameters that influence speed on a bike. And they would be, for example, weight; rider and bike weight, aerodynamics of the rider and of the bike. How does the whole system react to wind, the weather? Of course, for course profile, how many height meters? What’s the distance? And then, really importantly, the physiology of the rider; what's their, what's the size of their battery, so to speak? How hard can they push? For how long before they blow up? All these sorts of things. 

And if you've got all of this information, you can enter these into this tool and you can simulate very accurately over any course that you choose what the time will be? And then, once you've got that simulation set up, you can start playing with these parameters. What happens if the bike’s one kilo heavier? What happens if I improve the aerodynamics by 2%? What happens if the riding resistance increases or decreases? And like this, you can understand the sensitivity to time that the various parameters bring. In that way, you can really understand what leads to the best performance and you can, even for specific courses, which, for example, the Tour de France is very important. What setup should I do for this particular race? You can really then determine that. 

Then you can take it one step forwards and you can start doing kind of simulations really based on the physiology. Like, how hard should the rider push and where should they push hard to achieve the fastest time? So should they push harder on the hills? Should they push harder on the flats? And this is again, in association with Team INEOS, a lot of what we do to find what's the fastest way to reach the finish. 

FELICITY:

And in your presentation to Google, the aerodynamic revolution in cycling, you did mention some key points in that and the distinction. So I recommend people to watch that and we'll put that link in our show notes. But you did mention the bike, the savings in that and the watts and the helmet, the suits, the arm position and shape legs, even as a bit. I had a chuckle about that so…

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, absolutely. And one of the key take-homes from all of this is once we can really understand the whole system, we can identify where’s the most potential gain and what becomes very, very clear and you don't need a complicated tool. You can do this on a sheet of paper with some basic physics calculations. You can see the aerodynamic drag is the most important parameter for cycling. And that's why, coming from Formula 1, we were experts, in say, lightweight construction, carbon fibre construction; we were experts in aerodynamics. And so, we could very much say where do we need to invest our effort the most? And it was very clearly aerodynamics, which is why the USP of the Swiss Side brand is to be the absolute leading authority in aerodynamics in cycling. And that’s where we’ve specialized ourselves for that very reason because that's where the most potential is. 

FELICITY:

Yes, right. Well, you’ve got three branches to the Swiss Side business. The first one is the Swiss Side Wheels; so we’ve been talking about the proven, fastest aero wheels in the world right now and you produce this together with your key collaboration partner, DT Swiss. You have Aerodynamics by Swiss Side, which is your consulting business and you work for many of the leading brands in the world including Canyon, Cube and DT Swiss. And then, you also have the Swiss Side athlete and team support, which is your athlete support arm includes being the aerodynamics and performance simulation partner of Team INEOS (formerly Sky) as you mention for the last two years and supporting many of the top triathletes in the world including both Ironman World champions, Patrick Lange and Daniela Ryf but as well as many of the very other top athletes in the Ironman World. We’ve also seen some very interesting support projects on the way for athletes going to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. What do you work on specifically, Jean-Paul, with individual athletes and teams in your athlete support arm?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, so, again, our main target is to optimize aerodynamics for our athletes. So we take them; we use two things for that. We have our CFD, which is our computer simulation aerodynamics on the computer but we also have a wind tunnel and we do a lot of wind tunnel testing. I mean, we’re in the wind tunnel between one to one and a half weeks to a month testing with our athletes and optimizing equipment. And if we take Patrick Lange, for example, Ironman World Champion, we’ve had a huge program with him for the last three years and we’re in there looking at the complete systems, so we’re not just giving him the fastest wheels. 

And really important point, which you’ll hear from my Google talk is 75% of the aerodynamic drag comes the rider so that it is absolutely the first place to look if you want to improve your aerodynamics. So looking at what's on the rider, for example, the time trial suits that these guys wear. We do a lot of suit testing and we’ve got as well; we work closely together with Castelli, also because of the partnership with Team Ineos. They also happen to sponsor Patrick Lange and one of our other up and coming athletes, Laura Philipp. And so, together with Castelli, we can say, “Look. Hey, let’s change the ribs in the arm area. Let’s change the material in the aero around the back, for example, because we know where we can improve aerodynamics.” So a lot of time spent in the wind tunnel with these riders.

FELICITY:

And then you measure the time as well like the watts and also the time savings that they can…

JEAN-PAUL:

Absolutely. So for example, in our simulation tool, wind is a really important factor. And what people are beginning to understand more and more is bikes acts as like sailboats. So, it’s just the so-called sailing effect and the wheels play a really important role for that but the whole of bike rider system also plays a role and how you harness the wind effectively. And there’s always wind even when you can’t really feel it so much; there’s always wind out there. 

And so, for example, specifically for the Kona Ironman World Championship, which is in one week’s time; we really look at specifically finding the best setups for that course because there’s always a really strong crosswind there. So we look at what's the best setup in terms of the wheels, in terms of the bike, but also in terms of the suits because we see in the wind tunnel, we can do we can do the full range of crosswind so we can test in in what call, yaw, with the side wind simulation. And we find, for example, some suits work better or worse in crosswind. And that's for example, something you can't measure on the velodrome because they don't have wind. 

So that’s actually quite important when we really look at. Then, we can take that information and simulate the time and figure out what's the best suit, what’s the best setup to have the fastest time on their course.

FELICITY:

So that can actually translate to, like you say, the track as well, really, with that information. What doesn’t work for one scenario can work for another scenario. 

JEAN-PAUL:

Absolutely. And what’s quite interesting is we had some really interesting suits about six weeks ago in the wind tunnel with Castelli. And one of the suits wasn’t so great in a straight line. But it was really good at around about 10 to 15 degrees of crosswind angle and that’s like the main crosswind angle that we expect in Kona. And I grabbed the suit and I said, “This is the Kona suit.” And Patrick and Laura will be running that suit in Kona next week. 

FELICITY:

Well, that’s good to know. That gives them the best opportunity and it’s amazing really, isn’t it, what you can deduce from all that information and testing.

JEAN-PAUL:

Absolutely. And the really exciting thing is we’re not talking about marginal games. We’re not talking, “Oh, let’s save two or three seconds for them,” especially this 180-kilometer Ironman Course. 

FELICITY:

That’s right.

JEAN-PAUL:

And that particular suit, we calculate, it can offer up to four minutes of time-saving over the other one. And so, it’s a no-brainer. And if you don’t have those tools, and that’s what we bring to our athletes at Swiss Side. We bring in the ability to really find the best setups and the best equipment for them for their specific body shape, position on the bike and the [Inaudible 15:51]. 

FELICITY:

In Kona this year, as you’ve mentioned, you have a very extensive aerodynamics measurement program on the ground with the Aero tracer track, which will include both static measurement and as well as on the bike measurements and with your CdA meter and pressure measurement rakes. In the week leading up to the race, this will help your athletes lock down the best setup for their conditions as you just mentioned in relation to the suit, which you will forecast but also provide valuable data for your ongoing Kona 2020 developing projects. How has the data helped you to date? And can you give us an example of what you have changed or improved as a result?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes. Absolutely. Like, as I mentioned before, the importance of wind in cycling and particularly on races like Kona. And I think the suit, we’ve already mentioned, is sort of one of the main areas where we made specific changes and specific target and setup changes this year, leading up to this year’s Kona race. And we’ve been in Kona for the last three years on the ground each year making wind measurements so that we really have real data. 

FELICITY:

Okay.

JEAN-PAUL:

We’re taking up to next level this year because what we source is measure the wind on one day, you measure the wind on the next day, how can we better forecast what setups, what wind it’s going to be on race day? Because last year, for example, was a really interesting year. We had a lot of winds leading up to the race. And on race day, it was almost wind still and it was the first time that there was so little wind in about 20 years in Kona. 

FELICITY:

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

So basically, you how does the data help us? Like I mentioned, it helps us find the best setups specifically, for example, this year, to target wind suits that work the best in the wind. Also helmets; there’s a couple of new helmets on the market. We developed a helmet this year together with Rudy Project. Again, the helmet that is designed to work very well in crosswind conditions. So all of this data that we collect from making our measurements on the ground, we feedback into our system for developing our equipment for us and for our partners. 

FELICITY:

So does that mean, Jean-Paul, like if the instance of say, Kona, where you mentioned it was windy leading up the event and it wasn’t windy on the day? Do the athletes take multiple helmets and suits? I know that might sound ridiculous but when you’re talking about saving four minutes and it’s a domino effect. Like in your Google talk, you did talk about the position as well and obviously when you’re down on the drops obviously a lot more aerodynamic for instance. So it’s not just one point of difference, it's multiple things, isn’t it? So do they take, say two helmets and two suits because if one of the suits you tested as you mentioned with Castelli, that was better with a side wind, and then, just say there’s no wind, how do they manage that?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yeah, it’s a really good point. And it’s funny because in Formula 1, in motor racing, it’s very clear for every different racer that you bring sometimes a completely different car because every circuit has its own requirements to be fast. And it’s been traditional in cycling that you have a bike and you have your setup and you’re going to race that everywhere. Now, we definitely begin challenging that concept. Now, of course, if you’re average kind of a cyclist, you can’t turn up with two or three different bikes to each race. It’s, of course, not possible but if you’re a World Champion and you’re an absolute top athletes in the world, why not? 

And so, to answer the question, yes, we will take, for example, really simple ones; different wheels. If it’s a really windy day, the front wheel plays a massive role on the stability of the whole bike and rider’s system. If it gets too windy, you can’t run the really, really, big set of wheels anymore. And if we look at Patrick Lange; he’s a really lightweight rider, he’s 65 kilos. If it gets too windy, he needs to switch down a size of wheel on the front. And say, he’ll take a full series of wheels, we have three depths of wheels at Swiss Side: an 80, a 62 and a 48 millimetre wheel depths. All the wheels be available to him on the day. We will forecast the wind during the week. We will measure how he’s riding on the bike, how he’s coping with the stability because of course, we’ve got different setups that do affect that. And we make a call on Thursday night as to what setup he will race on race day. And then, he checks the bike in on Saturday. 

So typically, this year, we’re going with only one suit because we found that it would still work well enough in low wind conditions but we do expect really high crosswind conditions as always. So the suits are fixed component. Helmet is also a fixed component, for Patrick, at least, because his helmet works very well in crosswind. But how he rides the bike and his strategy as to when he pushes and when he doesn't will also be affected by what wind conditions we expect on the day. So, yes, he will be riding a specific setup and a specific strategy based on what we measure in the lead up to the race and forecast on race day. 

FELICITY:

Well, we wish him well. He was the Hawaiian Ironman Champion last year in 2018 with the fastest time of seven to eight hours so that’s amazing and I think you’ve just mentioned how you’ve helped him so that’s a tribute to you and his athletic ability.

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, absolutely. And last year as well, we know, we did a really big project with him to help his stability on the back. And what we did is we did a completely costumed cockpit design for him so the TT bike extensions, we designed completely integrated TT bike extensions that run along his whole forearms. And he was lying on the complete bars and he found that; we found that it did two things: one, it gave us an aerodynamic advantage so time-saving. But secondly, because he was leaning with his whole arm and not just two points elbow and hands on the TT extensions, gave him a lot more stability and a lot more comfort in the bike, which when you're doing your 8-hour race including the swim and the run, sort of the minimalizing comfort is important. And because when you're uncomfortable, you tend to tense up the body and that causes pain, it causes; it uses energy. So yes, we, for example, last year produce this costumed cockpit for him.

FELICITY:

Amazing. What about aerodynamics versus weight?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, I mean, it’s quite funny coming from Formula 1, we always look at everything objectively. And like we said, we have these simulation programs, we can simulate where the most point potential is. And in the cycling industry in the last 20 years, we’ve all been brainwashed about if it is all about weight. The truth is, it’s not; and actually weight is relatively unimportant most of the time. And the reason why weight became such an important topic is quite simply, it’s something that’s very easy for people to measure and it's very easy to understand. This is 100 grams lighter; it must be faster. And it is faster but how much faster is it? One second faster or is it one minute faster?

FELICITY:

That’s right.

JEAN-PAUL:

And we specifically take the whole Ironman in Kona, as an example; now, of course, this is a very extreme course where weight actually plays a very little role. To give you an example, for Patrick Lange, one kilo additional weight on his bike would cost him 25 seconds only over the four and a half hour race. 

FELICITY:

Okay.

JEAN-PAUL:

So it’s the weight sensitivity in Kona is very, very, very small.

FELICITY

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

But to put it more in context for your average cyclists, we’ve done a lot of work to help show people how unimportant weight is. And if you compare, relative to aerodynamics, what we did for one of the leading cycling magazines in Europe called RoadBIKE Magazine, we did test a where we went to the wind tunnel and he tested a complete lightweight setup. So that was a really lightweight bike, he had a really lightweight helmet, full kind of normal; your typical kind of lightweight setup; lightweight wheels. So we measured him, great; it was a UCI weight and the bike. 

Then what we did is we got an aero bike; one of this new aero road bikes was a lot heavier; had about one kilo heavier, complete bike and frames, aero wheels, he’ had one of these aero road helmets; got him set up. And we measured a significant aerodynamic advantage. 

Then what we do this is we got him to go out ride a course, back to back, over a few days. And it was 100 kilometre course with 1,500 height meters of climbing. Of course, we’d have simulation, too. We simulate him; what we expect. And we were simulating around about even over this 1,500 height meter course over 100 kilometres; we were simulating a 9-minute, 25-second advantage for the aero setup. And he went and rode it and did the repeat three times over a week and on average, he was ten minutes faster. 

FELICITY:

Wow.

JEAN-PAUL:

With the aero setup. And then, what we did is we said, “Okay, we’re using our simulation tool. How much weight would we need to save off that aero setup bike to have the equivalent time-saving?” And the answer was 11.6 kilos. So if you say the only thing you have to work with is the equipment that you have in terms of saving weight, unless you want to go on a crazy diet factor; you can’t save 11.6 kilos off seven and a half kilo bike setup. So it just shows you how important actually aerodynamics is in terms of being faster. If that’s your goal in cycling, is to be faster. So it basically just shows, you can’t neglect the aerodynamics in cycling if you’re going for speed. 

FELICITY:

That’s right. So that actually leads into the next question, which I think you’ve just answered really, but you might have some other tips. Do you have any tips to athletes, in particular cyclists, triathletes that needs to improve since the wheels have the biggest influence on the aerodynamic drag of the rider. I guess you just mentioned the weight is pretty much of no consequence. So that’s one; that’s a great thing, we don’t have to get on a diet and we can still enjoy our coffee or whatever it is, as we all do. Most of us do, I think. But, yes, are there any other; what would be the three key points that you would suggest to people?

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes, absolutely. Just quickly with regards to the wheels; the wheels do have a large influence on the stability of the bike and rider’s system and particularly the front wheel, how does it react in gusty conditions?

FELICITY:

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

So that's what I mean about when we say, not just because we're a real brand and we, of course, want to sell wheels.

FELICITY:

That’s right.

JEAN-PAUL:

But the wheels do have an important impact on the stability of the system. But the most important part of the system is you. You, the rider. Sitting up there on the top of the bike, you’re 80%; 75-80%, depending if triathlon road cycling, of the aerodynamic drag. 

FELICITY:

Yes.

JEAN-PAUL:

So if people say, “Where should I invest the most time?” The first thing I tell the people is go and do some yoga. See if you can ride some lower positions; if you can ride on the drops more often. Then you’re going to be faster. And that costs nothing. It cost a bit of course training; a bit of flexibility. 

The next thing I tell people is buy yourself an aero, type-fitting aero top or a one-piece suit if you’re racing; for sure. Don’t cost a fortune. You don’t have to invest on a completely new bike. Get yourself one of these new aero road helmets. These things all bring up significant savings. You can find three to five watts at 35 kilometres an hour in an aero road helmet. You can find seven to ten watts in suit. If you go lower, you can go saving yourself 30 or 40 watts. 

So there are crazy savings to be made just by looking at you, your body and your position on the bike and that is absolutely the first place people should look.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. That sounds fantastic and they’re simple like you say; they are easy to do to implement before you take the next step and say, get a new set of wheels, all of the bling. And of course, I’m pretty sure that most people would be going to get those anyway. And why not? If it’s a sport that you love and you are on the bike a lot, it’s definitely worth it. 

Are there any funny stories that you can share with us, Jean-Paul?

JEAN-PAUL:

Funny stories; all the time. I have to say, it’s really important to have fun.

FELICITY:

Yes.

JEAN-PAUL:

In your life and in your work and it does get stressful sometimes. And as far as one funny that just keeps repeating itself; in the wind tunnel, so we have; we do a lot of helmet development as well. We design helmets for various brands nowadays. And for that, we developed a special dummy for measuring the aerodynamic drag but also for heating up the head in the wind tunnel of this dummy. And we can measure the aerodynamic drag, we can measure the cooling. And we’ve got; this dummy, his name isYuraken 30:08 andYuraken has a really cool ‘80s looking blond wig. 

FELICITY:

Yes.

JEAN-PAUL:

And every time we go to the wind tunnel with any of our athletes, this wig becomes the centre point for fun. 

FELICITY:

Yes.

JEAN-PAUL:

And if anyone knows Patrick Lange, he doesn't have much hair.

FELICITY:

Right.

JEAN-PAUL:

He has no hair. When Patrick puts this wig on, he pretty much looks like something in a boogie night. And actually his girlfriend, who’s with us, his now wife, was with us at the last test and she was actually getting quite excited about Patrick with his blond wig on. SoYuraken’s wig in the wind tunnel that stand around most of our athletes and it’s always a bit of fun. 

FELICITY:

Oh, yes. It’s definitely worthwhile having fun along the way. We’re Aussies, so you do have to take a piece of it, don’t you? Really.

JEAN-PAUL:

Absolutely.

FELICITY:

Why not? Well, I’d like to thank you Jean-Paul, for joining me today. It’s been insightful and I’m sure our listeners can implement some of the tips you’ve mentioned, which are easy to do. And I’m sure, they will watch the Tour de France and de Giro and the triathlon; the Kona event with new interest with the tips that you’ve taught us today about the helmets, clothing and the aerodynamics.

Our listeners can find you on your website which iswww.swissside.com. You’re also on Insta at @jeanpaulballard and @swissside on all social media. So people can find you there. I'll put the link also in our show notes for the talk that you did with Google and I can reference you. And you’ve also got an End of Season Sale so check that out as well. Go to the website and see what they have there.

I really like to thank you, Jean-Paul. And thank you for your time and all the best at Kona.

JEAN-PAUL:

Yes. Thanks very much. And great to be able to share my passion with your listeners. So for all of you, inspiring athletes out there in cycling or triathlon, have fun and enjoy.

FELICITY:

Thanks for listening to the All Torque podcast. We'd love it if you would leave us a rating and review on iTunes. This helps us to deliver content you want to hear about. Please take a moment to share it with your friends and family on Instagram and Facebook. I'm Felicity Dales, see you next episode for another story of inspiration and motivation on the All Torque podcast. 


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