Episode 51 - Gearoid Towey

July 17, 2019 22 min read

Episode 51 - Gearoid Towey

 

In Episode 51 of the All Torque Podcast, Gearoid Towey, the Co-Founder of The Athlete Advantage and Crossing the Line Sport joins us to share his journey from being an Olympic rowing athlete to now working on their athlete development programin the space of mental health; supporting athletes, ex-athletes, personal development managers, coaches, clubs and federations together with The Final Whistle Group.

Gearoid represented Ireland in the Olympics and is a 3-time Olympian and a former World Rowing Champion. After retiring, he has then moved to Australia and has worked in sport-related careers before finally founding Crossing the Line Sport where they support retired athletes and bring a global community together and co-founding The Athlete Advantage.

In this episode we cover:

  • Gearoid’s story on how he got started in rowing, being an athlete, and competing in the Olympics to what he is doing today.
  • His transition and retirement from the sport.
  • He shares his experience in joining 3 Olympic Championships.
  • Gearoid reminisces on his funniest experiences during the Olympics.
  • He discusses why weight is one of the biggest challenges a rower faces when competing.
  • Common problems that athletes go through.
  • The most interesting thing he has seen in relation to athlete transition.
  • The difference between Ireland and Australia in relation to mindset or the problems in handling life after sport.
  • Gearoid tells us more about the Athlete Advantage Program which he is working with the Internation Cycling Executives Body on.

Links

Transcript:

FELICITY:

Welcome to the All Torque podcast, where each episode we interview an inspiring person to share their story with you. I'm your host, Felicity Dales, managing director of Body Torque.

This is Episode 51.

I have here today Gearoid Towey, the Co-Founder of The Athlete Advantage and Crossing the Line Sport. Gearoid is a 3-time Olympian and a former World Rowing Champion. His background includes doing a BA in Natural Science in Dublin, rowing for the Irish Rowing Team and attending three Olympics and becoming a World Rowing Champion in 2001. Gearoid is the owner of Boldly Go Ltd, an events company in Dublin and with the great race name, the ICE, [inaudible 00:38] Dublin Dares You and Urban Adventure Race and the Great Pink Run along with working with some not for profit organizations such as Breast Cancer Ireland, Irish Cancer Society and Childline.

You moved to Australia and then worked as an Athlete Career and Education Consultant for the New South Wales Institute of Sport and as a Career Development Advisor for the Football Federation of Australia for 18 months. Freelancing as a Sports Writer over that entire time for 11 years, founding Crossing the Line Sport, supporting athletes aiming to bring a global community of retiring athletes together, which has charity; to now co-founding The Athlete Advantage, joining up with The Final Whistle group to create an athlete development program in the space of mental health; supporting athletes, ex-athletes, personal development managers, coaches, clubs and federations.

Welcome, Gearoid.

GEAROID:

Thanks very much.

FELICITY:

It’s a pleasure. It’s great to have you here. Tell us about your story from where you were to being an athlete and competing the Olympics to where you are today.

GEAROID:

Well, I grew up in County Cork in Ireland. I grew up in a lovely, I guess you could picture, a kind of idyllic Irish, countryside environment at a local rowing club, from Fermoy Rowing Club, which is a Race Rowing Club down in Cork on a beautiful stretched river called The Blackwater. That's where I learned how to row. My siblings were rowers, too. They’re all older than I am. And the whole family kind of got involved in the rowing club. My dad, in particular, was very, very involved as a coach. And so, I used to get kind of brought down to the rowing club, as a kind of 6/7 year old; kind of just to hang around while my siblings were rowing. So of course, being the youngest, you always want to do what they’re doing.

FELICITY:

Yes.

GEAROID:

So I got basically obsessed with rowing and wanting to be out in the water. And it was a step-by-step process; like I started to kind of allowed to get put in the motorboat with the coach and allowed to actually cox cruise; this is kind of a stepping stone; then as you start rowing yourself. So it was really part of my life.

FELICITY:

A real family affair.

GEAROID:

Absolutely. From the Cork, I remember. And then, of course, once my schoolmates were kind of doing whatever they’re doing at weekends, I was travelling around the country to regattas and going to all these far-flung places around the country and absolutely loving it. So, I just trained really hard when I was a kid. I remember watching the Seoul Olympics. I was 11 years old and I was on my way out to school and the rowing was on the telly. And I remember just kind of looking at that and kind of going, “Oh, that looked really cool. I’d love to do that someday.” And then by the time the Barcelona Olympics rolled around, I was 15. By then, I was training really hard and I was like going, “I definitely want to be there next time.”

So yes, I was one of those kids that I guess got lucky in terms of developing a real passion for a sport. It kept me narrow. It really helped my school work as well because I was training really hard. I wasn’t; didn’t have enough energy to cause trouble at school. So yes, it was really good. And I just kind of, I guess, got quite obsessed with it and trained really hard and then I kind of got good quite quickly, when I started to grow because I was quite a small kid. And then I started growing quite fast when I was 16/17. And that’s when I really started to, I guess; get up there with some of the best in the world in rowing.

FELICITY:

Fantastic:

GEAROID:

And then, I went to the Junior World Championships and the Senior World Championships in the same year. And I won in the U233 World Championships and I did all that before the age of 19.

FELICITY:

Wow.

GEAROID:

I was going quite quickly, quite early. I guess you have to stay in the sport for a long time. I tried to and of course, it’s hard to stay up with that speed every year. So I had a couple of lean years after that. But then, I actually moved to the UK and trained.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

At Henley and Leander Club and then out to Nottingham. And I lived over there for pretty much six years. And in that time, I was still representing Ireland but I was training in the UK. And yes, I went to all the World Championships and went to Sydney Olympics. And of course, then you're under grave training then; it kind of becomes almost your profession. But with rowing, you kind of have a retreat from an early age, that rowing is great and all, but it’s not going to earn you a living. So we did earn a living from rowing but it wasn’t enough to secure your future. So we all got degrees and stuff for that while we were competing and training.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

Which is really good; it was sort of caring for life after sport. So I went to the Athens games. And I went to the Beijing Games. Well, I retired in Beijing 2008. Went to pretty much every World Championship in between; I missed one. I took a year off. And in that year off, I actually did the Atlantic Rowing Race, which was a bit of a crazy adventure. So it was pretty much a flat out career for probably 12/13 years. And then, I retired in Beijing. And haven’t sat in a boat since, pretty much.

FELICITY:

So an intense period, and then a straight line, chopping off.

GEAROID:

Yes, absolutely. It’s sort of like I reached a point where I guess when we did that Atlantic adventure; we were at sea for 40 days and nights. And we actually capsized, with about 10 days to go, and we lost our [inaudible 6:37] a bunch of times. And in that experience, getting rescued and what not, I guess that changed my outlook a little bit towards life in general, but also towards rowing. It didn't; it wasn't; I realized then, it wasn’t the life or death, I guess, scenario that you can put yourself in for rowing races or for any races, is that like, you kind of do feel like it’s life or death in terms of wanting to win the race. But in terms of real life and death, I guess when I came back from that, rowing boats fast really didn’t caught up for me anymore. So I kind of hang in there for the games but knew that it was going to be the last one.

And so, I guess I felt very well prepared for the transitional sport because I had the idea of retirement on paper. Like I had a degree, I had lots of other interest. I wanted to retire. I was retiring at the Olympics, which is, about winning an Olympic gold medal is as close to the top as you can get. [Inaudible 7:48] in terms, basically. So I was very surprised, like a year out from the Olympics when I was having a little bit of difficulty figuring out what I was going to do with my life. Having a degree wasn't enough. And that's when I got, I guess, into what I'm doing now.

FELICITY:

Right. So you’ve transitioned along the way.

GEAROID:

Yes. Absolutely. I mean, I think a lot of people, me included, lots of sports people; we always have a goal to aim for and it finishes, it’s almost like your life is pretty project-based. So you end up to be the project to the Olympics; the project is on the way to the Olympics for the World Championships. So you complain your year or even your day, down to the minute. And it’s all laid out in front of you. And that’s all good. Whereas, life in general doesn’t really work like that. But when you wake up and go, “Oh, I’ve transitioned.” It’s like, you just live life.

FELICITY:

Yes. What can you tell us about, or share with us, having competed in three Olympics?

GEAROID:

Yes, very interesting with the Olympics because, probably the Olympics were, I guess, the pinnacle of your career. But at the same time for me, they were almost like the biggest disappointments of my career because I didn’t get the results at the Olympics that I'd wanted. I'd say my biggest chance for an Olympic medal was in 2004 and kind of everything was lined up myself. And my doubles partner, we’re going quite well. We come ready before World Championships. There couldn’t be a better guy in terms of his strength and ability and his mindset. And we didn’t deliver at the Olympics and we were very disappointed with that. So it’s sort of like, the Olympics was, people think, it’s this big celebration of humanity and everyone is like, in the Olympic village, holding hands and being all friendly to each other. It’s actually not that at all. Like, it’s actually, when you’re there, it hurts as much to lose there as it does at any other race. So you don't have this feeling of like going, “Oh, we’ve lost.” "Oh, but you're at the Olympics." That doesn’t really happen. It's like, we’ve lost and it’s like, “Wow. It hurts.” So yes, I guess the big thing for that Olympics, our approach for the Olympics in general, is that they are like a pretty intense environment, not huge fun; like after we finish all that kind of stuff, and it’s such a spectacle. But really, it comes down to, that is just another event for us. And I just have the same feeling and the same kind of, I guess, experiences as any other championship.

FELICITY:

Well, I guess, depending on what your goals are and career. It’s a huge build up, isn't it? I mean, they’re in it for years. So it’s a massive emphasis on that as well as you have to be selected. So there is quite a big build up and lead up, I think, to that. And it does appear to be the pinnacle for most people or most athletes, I would say. And definitely for people who aren’t in the realms of ever getting into the Olympics. That’s definitely revered. So I can understand the disappointment.

GEAROID:

Yes. And I think as well, like I think some athletes who may have the goal as just going to the game and then they get disappointed when they’re there, because they’re athletes and they’re driven people who want to succeed. And just being there isn’t enough. Like making up the numbers is not like an enjoyable experience. Those people, I think, who are happy to be there, I think, when they’re actually are there, it’s not about, because they just want to be up there.

FELICITY:

Yes. That’s right. Yes.

GEAROID:

But in terms of being part of a global event like that, it is very special. It has kind of an aura about it; a mystique about it. It’s a special event. I've been at three.

FELICITY:

Yes. It’s very special. It’s great memories.

GEAROID:

[Crosstalk/Inaudible 11:57] Sydney Olympics and the Athens Olympics I thought were great Olympics. They were very well done. Like it was sort of very well organized but in quite a relaxed way.

FELICITY:

Yes.

GEAROID:

Very relaxed, friendly way. The Beijing Olympics was a completely different experience. You felt like you’re part of a machine.

FELICITY:

Alright. Interesting. Well, it’s good that you have the experience of the other 2 to know that.

GEAROID:

Yes.

FELICITY:

And feel the difference. So are there any funny stories from those experiences or anything else that you can share with us, Gearoid?

GEAROID:

Yes. Actually, at the Athens Olympics, it’s kind of funny looking back now. Back at the time, it wasn’t that funny. But we have an Olympic catalogue of [inaudible 12:39] leading up to our first race. On the day before we arrived, practice start, and we had a mishap with one of the oars and basically, the oar got ripped off; the oar and the rigger got ripped off at the side of the boat, which is what you don’t want to happen before the big race. So that was the first thing that happened and brought the boat in. Get it to boat builders. They were going to fix it. No problem.

And then we were back to our apartment. We have bought some bread on the way back and the Greek bread was kind of hard across the loaf on top. And my doubles partner, Sam, was cutting the bread and the blade right off across and basically straight into his fingers and when he saw the blood, he just passed out. And so I walked into the kitchen and I found him. He was like lying on the floor, passed out. I was like, “Oh my God."

So I just reached into the freezer. We had our ice vest in the freezer. I just put plenty ice vest on top of him and then he woke up and he was like, "Oh my God. Oh my God." He said, "I'm not losing, I'm not losing it," in terms of nervous and stuff, which I knew he lost, of course. But then we just patch him that day. It was fine. Then we raced the next morning. And we had to weigh in before every race. We had to be 70 kilos.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

So we had to do a little bit of sweating, which is very normal. And to sweat, you just put on loads of winter gear. Go out rolling; you lose a kilo. No big deal. That was something that we do all the time. But we were tying the boat down and I was starting to feel a little bit dizzy and woozy. And I was like, "Oh my God. I think I'm going to pass out." I actually just lay on the floor and then someone was pulling the clothes off me just to get some fresh air. And then the doctors came around and one of our, the teams that we are racing against were walking along beside us on their way to the race they looked at me on the floor and trying to wake me up and they kind of go, "Oh. Fantastic. These guys are having trouble." And then went up to the room. I waited and went up to the room. Check up by doctors, got cleared to race and we won. After all that.

FELICITY:

Oh my goodness. So what was your weight like?

GEAROID:

Oh, weight was fine. It's just funny that we had this catalogue of nightmares happening. [Inaudible 15:04]

FELICITY:

Yes. Absolutely. And was it always a battle to be sort of right on your weight around the weight? Was that always a bit of a challenge?

GEAROID:

Yes. It's kind of like the main, not the main, but it's one of the main challenges for rowers; so the average of the crew has to be 70 kilos.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

The maximum any one individual can be is 72 and a half kilos. So you can play around with the weights depending on how big people are. We weigh in two hours before, but no one who competes lightweight is a natural lightweight. We all are coming down from 79/80kilos, which would be all our natural weight. Basically, from Christmas onwards we would; the season was starting in April. And we basically start dieting from then. And so calorie-controlled diet. Just getting the body fat to as low as possible and try and get our muscle mass up as much possible.

So yes, we'll be cruising around that races like kind of 5% body fat kind of thing. It was quite like, I guess, regimented that way but kind of front and center in our minds all the time. Like how the way it is, we're always checking it like the weighing scales will always be there and then we get our weight down to like within two kilos the week of the race. And then you do it to four kilos through just changing what you eat and also sweating.

FELICITY:

Right. Is that similar to bodybuilders, Gearoid?

GEAROID:

It is, yes, in many ways. But also, it's not; because we're a power endurance sport. So if you get it wrong, it really depletes your capacity; like it can reduce it by 10 or 20% if you do get it wrong. We're balancing act between getting the weight up to be right and being able to race that way. So yes, it was very interesting that people used to say, "Oh. You're like jockeys." And we were like, "Yes, but we're also the horse."

FELICITY:

That's right. Exactly. Yes. You need more power. You are the power.

GEAROID:

Yes. Exactly. So it's a really great feeling when we got it right. Like we got it right; of course, a lot more times, we got it wrong and you learn from it. But it just became kind of natural towards the end.

FELICITY:

I guess you would refine it. Obviously, you've been to three Olympics, so you would want to know what you're doing, wouldn't you, when you get to that level.

GEAROID:

Yes. Absolutely. It was actually a really cool feeling to be that in tune with your body and actually, you almost feel everything you were eating. You just felt super sharp.

FELICITY:

Yes. Absolutely. Yes, I think that’s admirable. Where do you see problems for athletes from what you know and have seen?

GEAROID:

Okay. So in terms of what we’re doing now because we focus, everything is focused; our organization’s focus are on helping athletes prepare for their transition from sport to life after sport and beyond. And there’s a lot of challenges and very complex issue in amongst all that. Like there’s a whole lots of things that can commit to play. But a lot of it is the fact that you don’t really know what life after sport is going to be like until you’re actually living it. And when athletes are in the midst of competing, it's kind of a natural thing to just think about your competition or your training because it's so all-consuming. And a lot of people go down the rabbit hole of just doing that and then what happens is then, they retire, they think, “Oh, I’ll leave it until after I finish. I’ll think about it then.” But the trouble is, if you leave it until then, what you’re going to experience probably is an identity crisis because you finished one thing and you don't know what you’re going to do next. And that actually has a very profound impact on athletes who, from the age of 9/10, probably have been able to say who they are, what they do and where they’re going every year. And then not being able to, I guess, answer those questions, can be quite crushing for people who are used to be in control of their lives.

FELICITY:

Kind of the unknown.

GEAROID:

Exactly. So I guess the problems stands really from not having a passion; so being able to cultivate or nurture a passion as you move through your sporting career. And I see the value in that because the whole sporting, I guess, ecosystem has a role to play there. Because if the athletes are not doing it then; the people who influence them should be influencing them to do something alongside of sport. But that doesn’t always happen. There is some coaches out there who do believe in this work; but there's also a lot of them who don’t; that they would rather keep athletes training full time than pursuing something outside of sport. So that's a problem from the office; like the athletes realizing themselves that they need to do something and also that the sporting culture supporting them to do that. So in terms of the problems, like there's enough, kind of mentioned one or two. There’s a certain mindset in terms of being an athlete, like most athletes were dopamine hunters.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

Yes. Because obviously, it’s a challenging environment. It’s also a gamble because you’re doing all these training and preparation; compete on the world’s biggest stage. But there’s no guarantee that the result is going to happen. So it’s like being kind of roulette table in a way. And that’s addictive. So when the source of dopamine is taken away, then that actually kind of open up, so athletes can then, when they’re looking for dopamine when they finish, they can result in engaging in risky behaviour like [inaudible 21:45] and that kind of stuff. That taps into the athlete mindset that the dopamine thing, and then also combined with that is like their loss of identity, and the two together would be quite destructive. And a lot of athletes just feel anchorless for the first time in their lives. And if they haven’t prepared for that, eventually, if they don’t have the coping skills or the awareness around it, it’s just; there’s a whole lot of issues that make you run into.

And also losing guidance; like athletes, a number of them or most of them are very independent-minded and can look after themselves. But also, they always have a coach. They always have somebody they can bounce...

FELICITY:

Yes.

GEAROID:

They can get feedback at any moment of the day either from themselves, from their rivals, from their coaches, from their teammates, all the time. And so, when they leave sport, quite often, a lot of them don’t get coaching in career stuff or in life stuff. And so, that in itself can be hard because they just go in alone in that area that they don't have a clue about. And this feedback thing is very interesting because you can get feedback all the time as an athlete, like you can just get it instantly. Whereas in the working world, it doesn’t work like that. You could be in a job, sitting there, and you can ask somebody for feedback. And they’ll say, “Well, you’re still here, aren’t you?” Feedback isn’t as, I guess, readily available in the real world. And so a lot of the athletes cope with that, too.

FELICITY:

Yes. Whereas, the results show is the feedback, isn’t it? So your results are rather positive or negative. And so then, you can source what you need to fix it or accelerate it, I guess.

GEAROID:

Exactly, like as an example. Like they’re looking at, they’ve got their power output is right in front of them all the time. Like literally, it’s like, feedback central.

FELICITY:

Yes, that’s right. And I guess being an athlete can be quite isolating, now that I think about it, when you’re really just concentrating on your objective, without having, say, a more fully rounded life with other community, like you’re saying. Like involving family or including family, engaging, perhaps, with other sectors of the community, that perhaps, most athletes normally wouldn’t because they are so focused on their goals. So it can be quite isolating in that sense.

GEAROID:

It can be. What I think some of the most successful athletes are the ones who actually have managed to do both. Some of the most successful ones are the most relaxed. And so, there's a lesson to be learned there. Like it's sort of going all in and just being completely obsessed. It has a short lifespan and you would burnout eventually.

FELICITY:

Yes, that’s right. What’s the most interesting thing you’ve seen, Gearoid; that experience relating to athlete transition?

GEAROID:

I think when it comes to that, it depends on the sport a lot of the time as well because it’s sort of depending on the sport, right? So if you take, for example, cycling or triathlon, and I say, rowing, for instance, especially the weight ones; you spend enough of time, obviously, training. But also, you’ve got to get your body in a particular shape for it to be light and for it to be; so that you're able to climb mountains and do whatever. So you’re kind of operating at this cutting-edge all the time. And one of the things, actually, that’s very interesting is that a lot of athletes finish and they have body image problems, which can lead to eating disorders.

FELICITY:

Okay.

GEAROID:

And that’s male and female. And that's actually a very interesting part of the mix because if you're used to having a body with fibres and body fat and you’re looking at that in the mirror every day; with 7% of the body fat, you’re going to feel fat.

FELICITY:

Right.

GEAROID:

And so the whole perception of your body and how you look is totally skewed. And you’re used to holding this machine and actually taking pride in how you look and what you might look like. Coping with that is actually a kind of a bit of a hidden challenge within the sporting community because nobody likes to talk about their weight. No one likes to talk about what they look like in terms of when they're finished. And so, say, for instance, my own experience is that like, people used to say to me when I finished, “Oh, you look really healthy. You’ve packed on a couple of kilos. You actually look normal.” But in my head, I was just thinking, “I just look fat.” It’s completely ridiculous.

FELICITY:

Yes.

But that’s how the mind works in that regard. Just your body image and stuff. So that’s a very interesting thing is like on top of everything else, you’ve got to cope with your changing body as well.

FELICITY:

Yes. If you wouldn’t have thought that, I wouldn’t have thought that. That’s interesting. Is there any difference between Ireland and Australia in relation to mindset or the problems in handling life after sport?

GEAROID:

I would say that, the world over, it’s still a conundrum. It’s still an issue that is getting tackled bit by bit. I mean, Australia is quite advanced, I think, in this area. There’s lots of money being pumped into it now by the government to the areas and stuff. So they do have it, as part of, it’s in their mind’s eye, in the NRL for instance they have got like every program known to man. I mean, they’ve got an unbelievable support for their players.

But I think in Ireland, it’s the same. Like they do have programs; similar programs. But in terms of delivery, it's still very much a puzzle, I think, and hard, too. Because the problem is, is that training programs are fine because they’re kind of a one-size-fits-all thing. Like you go to your training program; generally, people follow the same program. Like there are few minor differences. But there’s lots of athletes who follows through these programs; some make it, some don’t. To get the results, they do whatever. But like, there's no real possibility for that with transition because what you’re dealing with is an individual who is completely separate from their sport. And if that person hasn’t been allowed or hasn’t done any work in discovering who they are, then it's going to be an issue. So in terms of dealing with individuals, I suppose you’re dealing with a collective. That’s probably one of the biggest problems; is how do you cater for thousands of completely different individuals with different goals and dreams versus thousands of athletes who are pretty much doing the same thing. So that’s the challenge. And I think it’s the same with the mind. The world over; I think Australia, definitely are doing well. Ireland, I think, well, as well. UK, I think, are doing well. But it’s a long way to go.

FELICITY:

Yes. You’re working with the ICE, the International Cycling Executives Body; let’s talk about that.

GEAROID:

Yes. So as part of our Athlete Advantage program; the athlete advantage is basically an athlete development and career transition program. So we bring mental health well-being and career development together. And just prepare athletes for retirement or to help athletes who are retired. So it has three components. One is an online learning, which is driven by one-on-one coaching. And so we have an online learning platform with 16 courses, pre-development, and also, mental health well-being. Our one-on-one coaching is driving that, it’s completely supporting that, which is, what they need is a coach.

And then, the second element of that is a mentoring program called M Squared. So we are preparing athletes for the workforce by imagining with a mentor in an industry that they’ve identified as being the one that they want to pursue. So it’s M Squared because you want it to be an exchange. Quite often, mentoring programs fail because athletes walk up to the meetings kind of unprepared. The mentors like giving them information, as opposed to the other way around. But athletes; they have a lot of transferable skills and they might not actually realize it. So what we do in the coaching process is to get into them to identify their transferable skills, and weave a story around them. So when they walk up to the mentoring session, they’ll actually be able to give as much as the mentor, as the mentor would give to them. So that exchange element will help the mentoring relationship survive.

And then, the final part of the program is we place the athletes in work experience placements in the company or in an industry that they’ve identified as being the one that they want to pursue. So with ICE, with International Cycling Executives, they’re actually helping us with the mentoring program elements. So they have a large number of executives that we work with across the world. And so, a lot of them, of course, are sports nuts. They know; they get together every month, and they go cycling together over breakfast and they have a lecture. And they just form a bit of community and a lot of married entrepreneurs are there, working as executives. And so, they’ve come aboard with us to provide mentors from their community. And so, we will then be using the International Cycling Executives community to be our mentors for the athletes. So they’ll be mentoring Olympic athletes, professional athletes, up and coming athletes; so it’s a whole range. And they’ve got such a whole widespread of industries that they look after. It’s a perfect match.

FELICITY:

Yes. Fantastic. That’s awesome. Well, sounds like that’s a great program for people to become involved with and sounds really interesting and very broad as well. Quite interesting having the mentors, as you say.

GEAROID:

Yes. Sort of a combination of the last, I guess, five years, of seeing what worked; what doesn’t work. We’ve tried and tested a few different things and this program needs development is what athletes need and want. And yes, we’re just kind of putting all the pieces of the puzzle together.

FELICITY:

Yes, that’s great. Well, I’d like to thank you, Gearoid, for joining me today. It’s been insightful; I’m sure our listeners can implement some of the feedback that you’ve given in relation to life after being an athlete and what to look out for even for people that they know that they could perhaps recommend you and your course. Our listeners can find you on your website; you’ve got the athleteadvantage.com and also crossingthelinesport.com. We’ll have all those details in our show notes and on our website, bodytorque.cc; so people can look you up there and also on LinkedIn. So yes, thanks for joining us today.

GEAROID:

Yes, thanks very much. I had a great chat. Thanks very much for having me.

FELICITY:

You’re welcome.

Thanks for listening to the All Torque podcast. We'd love it if you would leave us a rating and review on iTunes. This helps us to deliver content you want to hear about. Please take a moment to share it with your friends and family on Instagram and Facebook. I'm Felicity Dales, see you next episode for another story of inspiration and motivation on the All Torque podcast.


Subscribe