Episode 19 - Craig Johns

  

  

In this episode I talk to Craig Johns, founder and CEO of NRG2Perform for CEOs, business owners, and leaders aiming for peak performance. Craig is also a professional speaker and performance coach for NRG2Perform. He likewise holds the position of Executive Director for Triathlon ACT.

NRG2Perform brings energy, freedom and inspiration to every CEO in the world, so they can perform exceptional brilliance in all facets of their life and positively impact the lives of those around them.

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In this episode we cover: 

  • How Craig manages his busy lifestyle
  • The story of how sports all started for Craig
  • His coaches and how they influenced him as a person and in the sports he plays
  • His teaching and coaching story in Australia and overseas
  • His experiences and challenges coaching athletes with different nationalities
  • Elaboration of the NRG2Perform DNA
  • Distinction between athletes and CEOs and the 4 aspects and foundations needed to achieve what you want
  • Craig’s recommendation to incorporate sports in life to de-stress
  • Recurring problems that Craig sees in relaxing our minds, unwinding and fully recovering
  • The future of triathlon

Links

Transcript:

FELICITY:

Welcome to the All Torque podcast, where each episode we interview an inspiring person to share their story with you. I'm your host, Felicity Dales, managing director of Body Torque.

I have here today Craig Johns, the Founder and CEO of NRG2Perform, for CEOs, leaders, and business owners aiming for peak performance. Craig has 23 years of global experience working in the sport, health, mind, education, and hospitality businesses, including commercial businesses, not-for-profit, and sporting clubs. NRG2Perform brings energy, freedom, and inspiration to every CEO in the world, so they can perform exceptional brilliance in all facets of their life, and positively impact the lives of those around them.

Craig's extensive understanding of creating innovative products and services, developing successful programs, building thriving communities, and leading high performance teams ensures you are a step ahead of the game, where the ordinary don't belong. Welcome Craig.

CRAIG:

Thanks Felicity.

FELICITY:

Along with being the CEO, professional speaker, and performance coach for NRG2Perform, Craig, you're also the executive director of Triathlon ACT. This role is to develop the sport with membership recruitment and retention, club and coach development, marketing etcetera, to ensure a whole of sport approach with a new event portfolio increasing revenue, turning it from a deficit into a sustainable surplus.

Your prior experience also includes Head of Swimming at the British International School of Jeddah in Saudi Arabia, Director of Sports Academies in Thailand, developing Asia's first award winning integrative sport, mind, health, education, and hospitality resort and training centre, and being an accomplished athlete yourself for over 33 years, including hockey, swimming, cycling, mountain bike, triathlon, and golf.

Tell us, Craig, how do you manage all this and have the energy?

CRAIG:

Thanks Felicity. It's a pleasure to be on the show. I lead a very busy lifestyle. I think sport has always been part of my life. I think ever since I was able to crawl or walk, I've been very competitive, and either had a ball or something in my hand, or I was running somewhere, or trying to do something. I just love being outdoors and love that opportunity to be involved in sport, the feelings you get out of it, the way it makes you feel, the cognitive benefits you get out of that, and the people you meet.

Obviously, that's probably the most enjoyable aspect. There's so many great people out there involved in different sports so that's one of them.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. Yes, it does collect an array and a variety of personalities and it does make it interesting, doesn't it?

CRAIG:

Oh, for sure.

FELICITY:

Where did it all begin for you? We'd love to hear your story. How did it all start?

CRAIG:

I grew up in a small town in a province called Taranaki in New Zealand, on the North Island. My mum's side of the family were cricket mad, both coaches and players at regional level, and on my dad's side, they were hockey mad. There was always some sport around and as you can imagine, any get together was always very competitive and a lot of fun.

From there, I think I first started swimming when I was four years old. Unfortunately, my first ever swim teacher passed away last week, at the tender age of 86. He was still swimming, I think on his 80th birthday he did 80 laps of the pool.

FELICITY:

Wow. He's an inspiration.

CRAIG:

Oh, huge inspiration. Then, through into.. I started playing hockey at four or five years old, and just progressed through. Went into triathlons around the age of 15, and along the way was always playing many, many sports. Any chance to get out of school, or before bedtime, I was doing something. I had a lot of fun and was able to go to a fairly high level in a couple of sports, and represent New Zealand, which I'm very proud of, and really, really enjoyed.

FELICITY:

Yep. Were you coached with any of those sports along the way, Craig?

CRAIG:

Yeah, I had a variety of very good coaches. I was very fortunate to have people that were very empowering as coaches. They were very supportive. They weren't over demanding. They allowed you to grow, but also provided that motivation when required. Through hockey, I think my dad was there a lot along the way and he was a major influence. In swimming, in triathlon I had a variety of different coaches, depending on where I was living over the years.

I think without a coach, it's very difficult to get the best out of yourself, and they've had a major influence, not only the way I competed or to the level I got to, but also on who I am as a person. I think that's really important, that when you're looking at a coach and determining who you're going to work with, that you've got people that are passionate about growing you as a person.

Because in the end, sport's only for a certain amount of time and you want to continue on, so I felt very privileged to have these legacy approaches from those coaches.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. Hopefully, I think with your life now, that you're actually, it's like paying it forward yourself. You've been coached and you are coaching, so it's that pay it forward, isn't it?

CRAIG:

For sure. Teaching and coaching's been in my blood from a very young age. I think I first coached when I was 12 years old. The first paid coaching for swimming was around 15-16 years old, and I've been continuing coaching ever since that time. I went to a very small school when I was at primary school, we only had 26 kids, and by the end we only had seven and they had to close it in the last year, unfortunately.

But children were from the ages of 5 to 12, and we had teachers there that were very clever around the fact that they were getting each of the children to teach each other. It was a wonderful situation to be in, and I think I learned a lot from that early stages of my life, where I've taken it onto coaching and working in international schools, and now also working in the business world a lot more, where yes, I may not be coaching sport directly anymore, but I'm always coaching people.

I'm always putting myself in a position where I can teach people and continue learning myself, and ensuring that people can generally grow. That excites me. I think I'm a coach for life, and I think every leader, CEO, it's important that they approach the way they work in that same sense. You're not there to demand and tell people what to do. You're there to help people grow, learn, and become better at what they do, because that's what people like. They want to continue growing. People don't like being stale or stationary in whatever they're doing in life.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. You've actually coached overseas as well, so what, sorry, is it like to coach where English is a second language?

CRAIG:

It's very interesting. You have to learn very quickly how to communicate in many different ways. Observation becomes absolutely crucial and I know now that my experiences working in I think five countries now, that being in some of those situations, when I first coached the Taiwan National Triathlon team, the first three months I had athletes who spoke no English.

FELICITY:

Wow.

CRAIG:

And you're working at a national level, so you had to observe very closely, because when you're using translation, translation doesn't take emotions through. You've got to continually watch how the athletes walk into a session, how they're coping during a session, and try and figure out how you can carry that emotion across, if translation's being used.

Like, I used a lot of drawings, catered to different people's learning styles quite effectively. I think that's really important. I also got to see this firsthand of another coach doing this, Stefan Vidmar, who's a very prominent, famous swimming coach, originally from Switzerland. I think he's produced more than 30 or even close to 40 world champion swimmers out of Australia.

And I remember seeing him come up to Thailand where I was working and it was his first time meeting his Chinese team that he was going to work with. I remember sitting with him that night and I said, "Look, it doesn't matter how many world championships you've won, how many Olympic athletes you've had, you're going to learn more about communication in this year you're working with the Chinese team than you ever will in the rest of your life."

It was really fascinating to see him go through that process, or Stefan to come back to me and go, "Well, this is what I've experienced. How do I cope with this? What are some other ways I can continually learn?" I think that can help anyone, no matter whether they're a coach of sport or whether they're a teacher, or whether they're a CEO or leader in a business. That ability to observe, think about different learning styles, incorporate them into your day-to-day business, will help you grow and will also help the people you're working with.

FELICITY:

Yes, it's very interesting, because we do have different learning styles. Whether we're kinesthetic or audio or visual etcetera. That really hones your skills in, doesn't it? Doing that, working with athletes from a different country, when we're not speaking the same language. That really does, I think refine your skills on another level, if not another three levels, really.

CRAIG:

Definitely. I'll give you a really good case. When I was working at Taipei American School, I had a great colleague, Gene Surgeon, and we developed a program with the kids, and we actually would start these at age five. We'd put them into groups of three, one would be a student, one would be the coach, and one would be the mentor. The coach had to teach the student how to do, it might be a dive. Then, the observer would watch them, or the mentor would watch them, and then provide feedback to the coach about the way they presented the information, and help the person teach the dive. These are all five-year olds, so we would stand back and watch.

The next phase, we added different learning styles, so the coach could choose whether they would draw a picture, whether they would show them how to do it, whether they would write about it, whether they would put together a puzzle. We were constantly using different learning styles, and they had the opportunity to try those with the person they're working with, and then having that feedback mechanism there with the mentor, they could understand whether that style worked for that person or not, or, "Next time let's try this one and see if that works."

This is from the age of five, so it's really fascinating, and we now do that with the coach education where I'll put adults who are learning to become coaches into those same situations. It's amazing how quick the athletes will learn and also the coaches start to understand behaviours as well, how to deal with people who have different learning styles.

FELICITY:

And it also means that you then know how to communicate, so you can draw the best results out of them, or that they know, they have a better understanding really, learn more about themselves and as you say, grow. It's quite exciting, isn't it?

CRAIG:

Yeah, and a lot of fun, too, 'cause as a coach, I think you need to observe and listen a lot more than talking and doing. This way is a really great way to sit back and actually see it from a bird's eye view, and understand whether your coaching is actually working or not.

FELICITY:

I think that's probably a good point for all of society, actually, Craig. We probably can all listen a bit more than talking. You have the NRG2Perform DNA, which includes passion, light the spark that makes a difference, learn, plant a seed every day, freedom, live healthy, laugh lots, explore more, no regrets, ingenuity, inspire genius through creative collaboration, and performance, bring out the brilliance in everyone. Community, make friends and bring people together, and then challenge courageous in the uncomfortable and generosity, giving more than you receive.

I love all these, and feel that they're so beneficial for a meaningful life. Just wondering if you could elaborate more about that?

CRAIG:

Sure. I watch companies or I watch teams put together values and they're normally just a one word value. They have no meaning to them, because they're so open to speculation of what they actually mean. For me, I feel it's more important for a company or a team to actually develop philosophies and that's what our DNA is. It's eight philosophies and the reason why there's eight, eight is a lucky number in the Chinese or Asian culture, and that's just part of my DNA as well, 'cause I lived a long time up in that part of the world. So that's why eight came about.

And then it was around working with the people that are involved with NRG2Perform and going, "Look, what do we stand for? How do we want people to treat us? How do we want to work?" That's how we developed out those eight DNA, and we make sure that any decision that's made, anything that we're doing, is following those eight philosophies, and the way we do things, the way we live our life.

FELICITY:

Right. I think it's important to know your values, and I think a lot of us tend to overlook that, unless you really start searching and thinking about it, and it really guides you, it's a shining light, isn't it? The way, having a philosophy and then the values, it really gives you a good foundation and helps you to decide what to say yes to and what to say no to.

CRAIG:

Exactly. Everyone needs to have bought into it, too. It can't be just the leader deciding, "Here are our values." Everyone's got to be part of the process, 'cause otherwise, they don't feel like they've bought into it, and they won't actually live by it. They've got some skin in the game, so to speak.

FELICITY:

Do you find a distinction between athletes and CEO?

CRAIG:

Athletes and CEOs? I think everyone's trying to deliver performance, so we'll separate that I think from participation, it's slightly different. But if we've got athletes with the age group or elite, and they're focused on achieving a goal, it's no different to a CEO.

When it comes to performance, the same things are required. I think a lot of CEOs and leaders miss this point, and they don't get it. They're always trying to go for the cream or the tip of the high performance, say pyramid in what they're trying to achieve, rather than actually going, "Okay, have I got the foundations right?" It's no different for athletes.

Those foundations are, it's got to do with fitness, it's got to do with nutrition, it has to do with recovery, and emotions. If you don't have those four aspects, you're never going to be able to achieve the ceiling that you want to long term. That is a lot around active CEOs. How can we actually put things in place or systems in place for both the leader and organisations, so they can achieve their cognitive function that they need to, that they can achieve those high levels of creativity, they aren't putting themselves in a position where stress becomes a factor in their relationships within the organisation, outside the organisation, because of too much stress levels?

It's no different for athletes. I find really interesting when you get athletes who move into the work space, so they're going from being an athlete, where generally they have very good periodization. They do workloads, they've got the work/recovery ratio working well, and you've put them into an organisation and we especially see this when athletes go into small organisations, they just work and work and work and work and work, and keep working and don't stop, and next minute they're burned out in two years.

They have all these great attributes of time management, their work/rest ratio from a recovery point of view, and building up stress levels or building up workload, and then backing off. But when they come into the workforce, they just go, because they've got this energy. I've talked to a lot of interns or students and go, "Here's something you need to understand. You've got to manage your energy reserves from when you first start in the real world as a worker, if you really want to excel and perform at a high level in whatever you choose to work in." Exactly the same as being an athlete.

FELICITY:

Well, in a blog post, you mentioned that the type of life we lead is 100% a direct result of the choices we make. You mention that highly successful people are rock stars at efficiency, and with athletes, such as triathletes, having three disciplines to train for without anything else, what would you recommend them to be more efficient, but equally so you could say the same with CEOs, couldn't you? As you say, well the athletes get burned out, but I guess CEOs get burned out as well if they're not actually perhaps incorporating sport to balance the stress out.

CRAIG:

Isn't it interesting that there's a 40-hour work week? But people always trying to do 50, 60, 70, sometimes 80 hours a week. Or, why was the 40-hour work week put in place? It's because you need the recovery, so that you can come back and perform better next time you come into the workplace, or say as an athlete, you do a certain amount of work and then you recover and come again.

I think from a triathlete point of view, it's an endurance sport, which is a challenge, because there's generally quite a few hours involved. You've also got three sports, so you're trying to train three different sports as well, and you've generally got family life, social life that you're trying to fit in.

A lot of the time, people's aspirations are a lot bigger than what they can actually, or they're capable of, just because their whole life that's around them. I think a lot of the time they forget that there is going to be a stress and a tired workload from just working.

Or, the emotional aspects of dealing with the relationships, or being a family, or social aspects. They've got to manage their expectations around how much training can they actually do? They might go, "All right, well there's an elite athlete doing 25-30 hours a week, and I'm only doing 8. I've got to get to 12." Well, maybe 12 isn't going to work for you because you just physically don't have the time to do the training and be able to recover so that you can grow, get stronger, and become a better athlete.

From an efficiency point of view, they need to look at how can they cut out things that actually don't help them in moving forward? Is that just too much time sitting down watching worthless TV that actually doesn't help you? You do need to switch off, but how much is too much? Do they need to cut out some of their social media distractions? Are there other ways? There's just ways of looking at how you can effectively improve the times that you can recover, which is how you're going to improve and get better as an athlete.

FELICITY:

Definitely. I think being effective is really an important point there, because we can all be efficient doing certain things, but if it's not necessarily important, like a priority, then it's more important to be effective really, isn't it?

CRAIG:

Yeah, for sure. I think you've got to be able to understand what is a greater priority at that given time. Very hard to make everything a top priority. There's just not enough hours in the day.

FELICITY:

No, that's right. Exactly. I like too many things, so I can relate to that.

CRAIG:

It's difficult.

FELICITY:

Yeah, it is.

CRAIG:

Especially as a high achiever, and if you've got lots of different passions or areas that you enjoy, it is very difficult to say no sometimes. Or, it is difficult to pull back in a certain area, and we find a lot of those people in triathlon, in cycle as well, where they are A type, success driven, highly successful people, and quite often they're like, "I want to do that, but I want to do it really, really well," so there's got to be those trade offs at a certain point, which is hard to take.

FELICITY:

That's right, exactly. Yeah, you've got to put the work in, so to do that, you've got to funnel yourself down and there's something that's going to miss out at some point. Are there any common problems that you see over and over again, Craig?

CRAIG:

We see it all the time, where just people continually thinking that they need to add more time, or they don't stop during the day and take a break, whether it be 5 or 10 minutes, and let their mind relax. I think taking with the electronics, taking electronics into the bedroom, even though they may not be looking at it, you've still got blue light flashing, you've still got vibrations going on, you've still got that, "Oh, it's arm lengths away. I'll just check it."

What this is doing is every time consciously or subconsciously hear those noises or see it, or actually grab the phone, you're making your mind busy. All we're doing is frying our brain, and we're not giving it a chance to relax, unwind, and fully recover. I think we're going to see a lot of mental issues happening, they're starting to already. We're going to see a lot more happening around 2030, which people then are going to start reverse the way they're working.

We're going to see a lot of people start to then put down the phones, we're going to see a lot less social media activation happen, because people are realising that they just don't want to live this life where they're constantly fried, they're stressed, and it's leading to mental health problems.

FELICITY:

Yeah, I think that that's a good point. It's definitely, you really need do need to schedule time away from electronic devices, I think, and maybe being in nature more, and just totally switching off, relaxing. I find that you just really need to restore yourself.

CRAIG:

Yeah, it's powerful.

FELICITY:

We take it for granted, because obviously the mobile phone has just become automatic to have it with you all the time. I use it as my clock or my watch, so it can be a bit of a trap and yeah, it's certainly something to be very mindful of.

CRAIG:

Yeah, so I'm actually looking at putting a ... I actually don't use an alarm clock because I'm very good at waking up at 4:30 or 4:00 in the morning, no matter where I am in the world. Actually, putting an alarm clock in my room that's not the phone, so that I'm not actually thinking, "Oh okay, what time is it?" And waking up all hours of the night.

I actually put it there so I know, "All right, I just sleep through until that alarm goes off" or, “I don't move out of bed until that alarm goes off.” So, then I'm actually teaching myself habits to actually say, "All right, I need to get eight hours sleep a night, and to do that, I know that I just need to wait for that alarm before I get up" or whatever it may be.

FELICITY:

Yeah, it's good to get into that structure, and then it just happens. Where do you see the sport of triathlon evolving from here, Craig? Since you're involved with Triathlon ACT, what do you see in the future?

CRAIG:

Triathlon is still very young. I've been fortunate to be involved since 1989, so pretty much when it was in its infancy. It was very raw, very pioneering at the time, a lot of fun, because people were just putting on completely different races, training was just a whole experience, and we were trying to learn things every single day.

I think at this point, we have become very structured because of the advent of going into the Olympics, so now all the distances are very consistent. We know we have a sprint distance, we've got a standard distance, we have a half Ironman, we have an Ironman. That took a bit of the fun out of the sport, because we used to ... They weren't really that balanced sometimes.

Sometimes it would suit a runner, sometimes a cyclist, sometimes a swimmer, whereas now we know exactly what they are. That had to happen for the Olympics, and I get that, and understand that, but I'd like to see a lot more variety. I think we're starting to see that come back. I think that's one aspect.

Two, we still haven't figured out how to coach triathlon. There's still very little research in triathlon. People are still using a lot of swim information, cycle information, run information, but that's not triathlon. Triathlon is three sports plus you've got transitions. I think they happen quite differently than what they would if you were just a swimmer, and I'm starting see a lot more things now, and I think I'm a better coach now by actually stepping out of coaching, because now I can actually see it from a different angle and starting to see things like for instance, when we teach people how to swim, or coaching people how to swim for triathlon, we teach them try to get as horizontal as possible and be super efficient.

We're putting them in these positions all the time, and then when they go out into a race where they've got a couple of hundred people around them, sometimes a couple of thousand people around them, got nervous energy, there's a lot of whitewater going on, sometimes you can't see through the water because it's darker water, you can't see the bottom, you might have sunlight there, you've got feet, arms, legs all around you, and you're trying to sight where the swim buoy is.

We actually start to go from a horizontal position to a slight vertical position where we're on an angle, because our head's coming up, so our hips drop and our feet drop. Now, we do a little bit of training for sighting which does that, but we don't actually teach.. Especially those who aren't out the front. If you're out the front, you can swim pretty horizontal, but most of them don't get to go in that position, so they're actually swimming uphill, so to speak.

It's very difficult to actually try and get horizontal when you have got so many arms, legs, white water, happening around you. We're not actually training that way, and a lot of the time triathletes will put pool buoys on, and they don't actually focus enough on their kick, but when it comes to the actual race, you actually need to kick a lot because their bodies are now on an angle, their arms are pulling in a slightly different angle, so the stress on the muscles is different.

They get tired quite quickly, they get exhausted, or they feel stressed out because they're not used to that position, so I think coaches need to look at what's actually happening in a race and actually integrate that a lot more into training. I think we've only scraped the surface on this, and I think we can go a lot further in the way we look at the way people are coached, and also with their athletes, what are they doing? I see that aspect.

I think we've just been through a phase where people have been really interested in the adventure type challenge. We've seen a lot of people go into the CrossFit, the mud runs, the colour runs, etcetera. They've gone away a little bit from those endurance type challenges. It's a cyclical nature. We used to have those kind of things back in the early '80s. They were different names.

And then people went back to the endurance type challenges, so we started to see this earlier this year. A lot of people transitioning back into that endurance type challenge, so I think there's going to be a really strong growth period over the next 10 years in both triathlon, running marathons, cycling, where people go, "You know what? I want to have a go at that." It's a generational thing, so I think that's where we're trending in that area.

The competitiveness of triathlon's going to get a lot stronger at the top level. Before, the depth wasn't there, but as the sport matures around the world, you get more countries, you get more performance type programs in place, that's going to come up, and it's also going to happen at age group level. We're already seeing that, and I think our biggest issue from integrity is actually going to be in the age group level where they're trying to push the boundaries because they want to win their age group at world champs, or at Ironman level.

For those who don't know, triathlon's a very unique sport, where you can actually go to the same world champs as the elite level athletes, and you get to race in five-year categories. That's right through to the 85+ categories. That happens at sprint distance, standard distance, half Ironman, Ironman, duathlon, cross triathlon. There's a lot of opportunities for age groupers to go away and represent their country, wear their green and gold in Australia, or the silver fern for New Zealand, and compete at that high level.

We've already seen it happening where because age groupers are rarely tested for drugs, that we're actually starting to see that a lot more people are using that. That's a real concern for me, and we're trying to counteract that. We do do some testing, it's quite random, at different events around the world, and we have picked up age groupers already.

FELICITY:

Oh, wow.

CRAIG:

I’ve seen age groupers who you can tell are on it.

FELICITY:

Oh, wow.

CRAIG:

And we can see the changes. It's a real shame for me.

FELICITY:

That surprises me. I didn't realise that they'd be doing it. I've got a couple of friends that have raced. One's actually racing now and another one's come back, so they're really proud to be representing Australia and it's great. It's fantastic. Didn't realise that they were getting into the drugs.

CRAIG:

It tends to happen, because you're getting A type, success driven people, they generally come into what happens in life, right? You go through school, it's a very structured life, then you go to an unstructured life when you go to university, so people tend to go to the gym rather than playing sport so much, because they are trying to look good, to attract a partner generally. They are then also focused on work, so everything starts to focus on something else rather than themselves.

It's getting a partner, starting a family, having kids, working for someone. When they get to that 35, 40, 45-year-old age group, which is what we sometimes turn the midlife crisis, that's the point when people go, "You know what? I actually want some time for myself." That's why endurance sports like cycling or running or triathlon become quite attractive to those people because they can go, "You know what? This is all about me and I'm going to go that way."

What you find is there's a lot of people who have earned a lot of money and may be semi-retired or own their own business, so they can train a lot more. They might have been someone that never, ever got on the podium at school, but they're like, "You know what? I've got time to train now. I've got money, so let's push the boundaries" so they push and push and push, and next minute they're going, "You know what? I'm not going to get tested, so I'm going to take this, 'cause I'm sick of getting second or third to such and such from another country, or from another club" and then go, "I'm going to push that boundary."

That's really scary, and I don't think it happens that often, but we are seeing more occurrences of it starting to happen.

FELICITY:

Well, it's good to be aware of it I guess, and then track it, and monitor it accordingly. That's all you can do, isn't it?

CRAIG:

Yeah, for sure. I think we've got responsibility from everyone involved in the sports, in endurance sports, to be constantly putting out messages and making sure that it's about trying to improve yourself, and it's not about winning. I think you had on one of your earlier podcasts, where you had a cycling coach talk around the fact that when you do cycling or an endurance type sport, there might be one winner and there are 190 or 200 losers.

Whereas, a team sport, you've got a pretty good chance of winning every second week, or at least a couple of times during the season. Whereas endurance sports you don't get that. You either win or you don't win. It's about making sure that the expectations of the athletes are around you're improving yourself, and you're getting better, rather than going gold medal is where you need to be.

FELICITY:

That's right. And feeling good about yourself regardless really, that you're participating and having fun along the way.

CRAIG:

Oh, definitely. I think probably 75-80% of athletes are inclined that way. They just enjoy the sport, they love the social aspect, they love the benefits of being fit and healthy and how that affects the rest of their life, whether at work, or their relationships, or family etcetera.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. Well, Craig, I’d like to thank you for joining us today. It’s been fascinating learning about your business and what you’ve been doing and sharing that with us, loved hearing your story. I’d like to let our listeners know that they can find you on your website, which we’ll put in our show notes. The website is www.nrg2perform.com and also you’re on LinkedIn, so we’ll have that link in our show notes, as well.

Facebook is NRG2Perform and you also have a podcast called The Active CEO, so if any of our listeners would like to go and check Craig out, you can see all those links in our show notes or follow him from there.

Thank you very much.

CRAIG:

Felicity, it’s been great and thank you for the great questions and we love what you’re doing with the All Torque podcast. It’s providing some great insights into the world of cycling and the people that are involved.

FELICITY:

 

Thanks, Craig. Much appreciated.

CRAIG:

You’re welcome.

FELICITY:

Thanks for listening to the All Torque podcast. We'd love it if you would leave us a rating and review on iTunes. This helps us to deliver content you want to hear about. Please take a moment to share it with your friends and family on Instagram and Facebook. I'm Felicity Dales, see you next episode for another story of inspiration and motivation on the All Torque podcast.


 

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