Episode 13 - Cameron Nicholls

 

  

 

In this episode we talk to Cameron Nicholls, founder of Bike Chaser, a business that changes the way online connects our great cycling community. Bike Chaser was started in March 2013 and has grown immensely since then providing quality choices for bikes and parts from individuals and bike shops in Australia.

 

In this episode we cover: 

  • Statistics of the Bike Chaser Site
  • What prompted Cameron to transition from being a corporate employee to running his own business
  • The story and reason behind selling his high-end road bike to finance him longer
  • Books that guided him before making the big move
  • The things he would do differently if given the chance to do it over
  • The mistakes they’ve made in building their business and what they learned from it
  • Future for Bike Chaser
  • The connection and relationship people need with their bike shops
  • Cameron’s motivation to ride the length of New Zealand mid-winter to raise $11,400 for the Ride the Long White Cloud CanTeen
  • Elevating the strength of the Bike Chaser website
  • Advice or message about cycling from Cameron
  • Biking as a simple solution to the world’s most complex problems like your mental health, physical health and city congestion
  • Cycling as an alternative to spending on infrastructure

 

Links:

 

Transcript:

 

FELICITY:

Episode number 13. Welcome to the All Torque podcast, where each episode we interview an inspiring person to share their story with you. I'm your host, Felicity Dales, managing director of Body Torque.

I have here today Cameron Nicholls, who is changing the way in which online connects our great cycling community, with his business, Bike Chaser, founded in March 2013. Bike Chaser exists to support and foster the growth of the Australian cycling community by providing a platform for cyclists to connect, trade, and unite. The Bike Chaser platform site has gone from ten bike shops to 47, and gone from 1,500 cycling products to 4,300, built a blog that had 1,000 visitors a month, now in excess of 10,000. What a great achievement. Welcome, Cameron.

CAMERON:

Thank you very much for having me.

FELICITY:

You're welcome. Your background..

CAMERON:

I'll just correct you on a few of those stats, because we've had a bit of an influx in the last week for a promotion which has worked really well, and I'm happy to walk you through it.

FELICITY:

Great.

CAMERON:

We're now at 87 bike shops. We've signed up about 40 in the last week.

FELICITY:

Fantastic.

CAMERON:

Products-wise, I'm not actually sure. I think I'm a bit over what you mentioned. Traffic-wise, we're close to three times what you mentioned there as well. So really, the growth in the last week in terms of bike stores and traffic and awareness in the last month or two, we're wondering if we've reached a bit of a tipping point, you know? I've read that book recently called The Tipping Point, where you do all these things and then eventually things will tip. So we feel like we're on a bit of an upward trajectory now, which is great.

FELICITY:

Yeah, fantastic. Hopefully, no looking back.

CAMERON:

Yes. Yes. Yeah, I hope so. It's been a long, long grind, as you mentioned, 2013. When I think about that, wow, it's a long time.

FELICITY:

That's right. Absolutely. Your background includes being a divisional manager for a global recruitment company, BTA, and then as a state sales manager for Experian in business development for close to three years, moving to Oracle NetSuite as account executive for three and a half years in business management software. You then became the director of sales for Medallia Inc. for cloud-based software also for three years. Tell us about your story. How did you transition from being in the corporate space just over a year ago, to running your own business? What prompted the move?

CAMERON:

Yeah. I was basically working for American software companies for a number of years. But it was way back in 2012, my brother-in-law, who's Danish, we were having a family barbecue. At that point in time, I'd been road cycling for about three or four years. I was just in the depth of being completely addicted to all the gear, so wheels and frames and bikes, you name it, I couldn't get enough. As a result, I was selling a lot of stuff on eBay, and BikeExchange was around back then. The Facebook groups didn't exist back then. I was using all the platforms. I was expressing some frustrations to him about as a user just wanting to have one platform where I could do everything. He sent me an SMS the next day and said, "Let's catch up to brainstorm."

So we, late 2012, brainstormed. We set up a, you said 2013, we sort of set up a blog initially just to build traction, just to get the ball rolling. Whilst I was working in the American software companies, I was doing this Bike Chaser on the side. It was actually called Auction My Ride in 2013 because we originally wanted to make it an auction platform. But then when we decided to invest a fair bit into getting the site developed properly and we found out about the cost of doing auction, we changed the name to Bike Chaser. By the end of 2015, if I fast-track a few years, we had finally built a marketplace. We'd spent tens of thousands of dollars. And then probably a few months after launching the marketplace live to end users, it wasn't even available for bike shops at the back end of 2015, we recognised that, "Geez, if we really want to have a proper platform, we're going to have to spend a lot more than what we had personally invested into it."

This is while I'm working for American software company, on the side, we spent 2016 looking, yeah, 2016. I'm losing track of my years now, 2016 looking for a business partner that could either act as a capital investor into Bike Chaser, or had web development expertise and use their expertise to invest into the Bike Chaser platform. That's essentially what we did. We sold a big portion of our business in 2016. When I say we, me and my brother-in-law, to a company called Light Media. As part of their buy-in, they've invested hundreds and thousands of dollars into web development to take our platform to the next level.

Getting back to your original question, it wasn't really until the start of 2017, so about 18 months ago now, where we'd been on this really long journey. But I finally got confident that we had a good platform, we had a good product, and it was time for me to bite the bullet and have a crack at doing this thing that I started many years ago full-time. So yeah, sorry, bit of a long answer to your question there. Hopefully, that provides a context.

FELICITY:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, you've certainly put in the hard yards, even selling your high-end road bike back to Hampton Cycles to cash flow you a bit longer. That's dedication. How did you feel after that?

CAMERON:

Yeah, I think what I've recognised as part of the process, is that I'm not overly motivated by money, I'm more motivated by purpose. I mean, I like working for American software companies and the development was great and the team culture was great. I certainly learnt a lot. But I never really had purpose. I think since I've been doing Bike Chaser, I've really felt like I've got more purpose. Obviously, it's my own thing, but I love the bicycle industry. I love the fact that the bicycle's a simple solution to some of the world's most complex problems, so inner-city congestion, health and wellbeing, mental health and all that kind of stuff.

So being part of the industry is really great. When I got to a point where I was really running out of cash, because when I went full-time at Bike Chaser without a salary, I probably had about six to eight months of capital just to work full-time. I sort of recognised that, "Do I go back to work, or do I just really try and make this continue to work?" I'm actually still not getting paid a salary even now. And that, you know, selling my road bike to be able to, I mean, I still bought another one. I bought a much cheaper one because I couldn't stop cycling, but I was able to pocket a few thousand dollars just to keep me going. So yeah, I think selling my road bike, as you said, to just help continue to fund my life was a bit of a recognition that just working for a purpose, as opposed to for monetary reasons, was a big driver for me.

FELICITY:

When you've got clarity and purpose, it does really give you a goal to gun for, doesn't it, so it keeps you focused and on track.

CAMERON:

Yeah, hundred percent. Exactly right.

FELICITY:

What types of books did you read prior to making the move? I know that you mentioned Tipping Point just earlier. Were there any other books that helped you and also guided you?

CAMERON:

I try and read one personal development book every month. The book that I've just read is called The One Thing.

FELICITY:

Oh, yes. I've got that. That's one on the to-do list. Yeah.

CAMERON:

But yeah. And actually, it was a motivating factor because as part of doing the Bike Chaser, we've had a whole bunch of, and myself personally, you just get brought into a whole bunch of other things that are going on. Me and my business partner actually almost started an SEO business a few months ago, because we just found our way into it because some of our bike shop clients were saying, "Hey, how did you do this on Bike Chaser? How did you do that with your social?" and we just started helping them. It was a way for us to earn a bit of money as well. I was doing some other stuff. So I was like, "Wow, all of a sudden, every week I'm doing too many things." That was the reason for The One Thing. So that's been really good, a grounding book, just to get me refocused.

Other books that I've read that I really like is, and this is an old one. I read it probably about 18 months ago. It was probably around the time where I decided to take the leap into Bike Chaser, and that is The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

FELICITY:

Oh, yes.

CAMERON:

Have you read that book?

FELICITY:

I have.

CAMERON:

Yeah. So that prioritisation graph where you have things that you need to prioritise and things you want to prioritise but you do them later, etcetera. So I sort of run one of those every single week before I start my week, to make sure I've got my things aligned. So that's been a really useful book.

Stumbling Upon Happiness was just another good book for me because it sort of put things into perspective about how we see happiness and how we, once again, going back to that purpose thing.

They're the ones that sort of stick out in my mind. I mean, as I said, I read 12 a year. But they're probably the main ones that have, in probably the last 12 months, that have really stuck out for me.

FELICITY:

I think the happiness one's interesting. I know that I'm happy when I'm on my bike.

CAMERON:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, hundred percent.

FELICITY:

That's pretty consistent. Yeah.

CAMERON:

Yeah.

FELICITY:

What would you do differently if you had your time over? Would you change anything, Cameron?

CAMERON:

Is this with Bike Chaser? Or just in, yeah.

FELICITY:

Yeah, with Bike Chaser. Yeah.

CAMERON:

I think the list would be so long.

FELICITY:

Really?

CAMERON:

Yeah, this conversation would go for an hour. I think when a lot of people start businesses.. I don't know the statistics here.. but when a lot of people start their own business, they've probably got expertise in the area. They probably have worked in the industry, or they know something, and they've recognised that there's a gap. We sort of thought there was a gap, but both of us were riders. We didn't work in marketplaces. We didn't work for bike shops. We didn't know anything about SEO and digital optimisation and what bike stores were like. We knew nothing. It's all been a massive learning curve. As a result, we've made some mistakes along the way in terms of being naïve about thinking we could build a proper marketplace for $40,000. No, sorry, you can't do that. To think you could start a marketplace and traffic would just come. No, that doesn't work.

Going back to what I was saying earlier about how we've had a hugely successful week in terms of acquiring new bike shops, when we first took Bike Chaser to market, we were selling it for a dollar a month. You think that's a no-brainer, but there's friction there because people have to enter their credit card details, and it's still a dollar. So literally a week and a half ago, we decided to make the platform completely free. No credit card, no nothing. All you have to do is register, and you can start adding products. Now, that was supported by quite a good video and a targeted campaign that we've set up to go out on some social streams. But we've doubled our client base. In 18 months, we got to 40, you mentioned earlier, 47 shops .. now we've got almost 90. That's all happened within the course of a week. Now, we start seeing some of these positive things. We're like, "Geez, we wish we did that earlier. We wish we made it zero dollars upfront. We wish we knew and started working more on content and SEO."

I mean, one of the big things with a marketplace.. one, you don't see many new ones coming up. You've got your eBays, you've got your Gumtrees, your BikeExchanges, you know, these ones that have been around long period of time, but very rarely do you see a new one coming through. I think one of the primary reasons for that is they're so heavily reliant on traffic. You're selling a platform which is, yes, it's technology and functionality, but it's also without lots of people going there, where's the value for a bike store to put up products, or an end user to put up products? Or for somebody who's going to the site and wants to buy something, it's the chicken and egg, right?

FELICITY:

That's right.

CAMERON:

This is the thing we probably still struggle with today which we haven’t nailed was, do we focus on getting products on the platform first? Do we focus on getting end users to the platform first? If you're focusing on getting end users, there's no products there. If you're focusing on getting products there, all the bike shops are saying, "Hey, where are my leads? I'm investing my time in this platform." So I think it's a bit of a, look, the underlying challenge as well is we've had no capital, really, to invest into paying for third parties to help us out. We've sort of really done most of it, outside of the web development, we've done most of it ourselves. But as a result, it's been a really positive learning curve. We've learned so much, I've enjoyed that process of learning a lot. I think right now, 12 to 18 months, really narrowing in and going full-time, everything's so much more clearer to me and also business partners.

FELICITY:

Which is great because then you've got more support as well. And you do need to workshop with people, check in, you know, get feedback, don't you? Because it's so dynamic. There's so many things going on, you can't do it all yourself.

CAMERON:

Yeah, no, exactly right. Look, my brother-in-law, who I talked about earlier, he's actually going to be exiting the business because what we're doing here, it's not got an overnight success. Things don't just happen super quickly, and it's a bit of a grind. He's been in the business now pretty much since day one. But he's at a part of his life where he wants to, he just bought a house. He's married to my sister. They want to have kids. He needs the guarantee of the salary and things like that.

So we're moving into a new era in Bike Chaser. But I think the reason why I tell you that scenario and what that represents is, it's a real grind. I talk to you now with energy and positivity because we've had some really good things happen in recent times, but there have been some pretty dark times as well where you really sort of question the validity of what you're doing.

FELICITY:

Yeah. Absolutely. I can understand that. What does the future look like then, looking on the positive side and moving forward with that under your belt, having some great new shops on board, what does the future look like from now?

CAMERON:

Yeah. There's three of us now that are owners of Bike Chaser. We've got obviously a development team that sits behind it. We've actually hired some additional resources that we've got to help with content writing and SEO and stuff like that. We're still focused very much on content and making sure that we're high in the Google rankings, because we need traffic, right? That what drives the value to our, that's what connects people to the local bike store. So that's really our primary model, because it's my personal belief that the local bike store is the best place to support your bike riding journey.

But in addition to that, is probably our primary focus right now is just acquisition. We spent a long time, probably 12 months, in a deep, dark abyss of content and SEO, and that's just to get a lot of traffic to the website. Now, we've got a good value proposition for stores. Whereas 18 months ago, when I was trying to sign up bike stores, they were like, "Who's Bike Chaser? Never heard of you. Where's your traffic? Where are our leads?" Which is a fair enough question. They're busy operators. But right now, with the work we’ve done, in terms of, as I said, content and traffic and SEO, we've now got a really valuable proposition for bike shops. We've made it free. It's all about getting as many bike stores on the platform as we can to ultimately service the needs of our users, because we've got tens of thousands of people coming and using the platform now. They read our content. They're going to the marketplace looking for a product, many of them looking for relationship with a local bike store.

Now, if we can fill the gap of we really want to try and get towards 500 bike stores in Australia. We think there's about 1200. So if we can get to close to 50% of the market, I think then we've got a really solid foundation of clients, and then we need to make sure they're getting products into the platform at the same time as registering. I think from there, what we're going to see, is it really just, I think we've already stepped up one level in recent times. I think if we can get that acquisition, we can get bike shops adding products to the Bike Chaser platform, we can get our users spending more time on Bike Chaser, Google likes all those type of things, we'll just see it continue to grow and develop.

FELICITY:

Absolutely. So we could ask our listeners to ask their bike shop if they're part of your network, and if not, to join Bike Chaser, basically. They mightn't even know about you, so it'd be good to get a bit of encouragement from a different angle.

CAMERON:

Yeah, hundred percent. The main question we get from people is how we're different. Look, it's a marketplace at the end of the day, so the fundamentals are the same. But I've said content and traffic probably a hundred times now, but it's obviously a big part of what we do. The vast majority of the traffic that lands on Bike Chaser doesn't land on the homepage, it lands on our content. The content is educating buyers about what bikes are out there. And in every content that we write, we also talk about the value proposition of the local bike store. We feel we're cultivating a different type of audience at Bike Chaser, because they're reading content or seeing content, because we do a lot of videos as well, before they go into the marketplace itself.

FELICITY:

Excellent. I think cycling's really relationship-based. I bunch ride, and that's all about friendships and relationships. I think like you say, when you go into a bike shop, I really like being looked after. So it's nice to have that, well, one, a great experience but also being recognised, you know, being able to chat with them, get support, you know, when you have an issue, be able to discuss it and they support you. So you know, I think it's a great initiative, to be encouraging bike shops to not only one, get on board, but you're supporting them as well. Because I do think they need the support, because it's easy for everyone to just say, "Go online," but at the end of the day, we still do need interaction and relationships. I mean, that's why we ride and have coffee. So yeah.

CAMERON:

Hundred percent. Exactly what you said is why we believe in the local bike store. Obviously, I speak about this a lot every day. I've spoken to so many people that have bought, it's the lure of online. It's cheaper. I'm buying my first or second bike, and I decide to buy something online and I get it, and it's not right for me.

FELICITY:

That’s right.

CAMERON:

It just happens so much. And then they don't have anywhere to go and ask questions. As you mentioned before, you want to go somewhere and go, "Okay, what's wrong with this?" Or you want to learn about something, you want to learn about the local criterium scene, or you want to get coached, or whatever it might be. It's my own personal experiences as well that really drive the passion. I actually went rogue for a couple of years and I just shopped on Wiggle non-stop, and I lost a connection with a local bike store. I bought heaps of stuff I didn't need. I didn't take stuff back when it didn't fit.

I love walking past Hampton Cycles' my local bike shop and now more bike shops, because I've got a relationship with many more, and just going in and having a chat. You learn something every time. I think people just need to be remembered quite often about that value that you do get through the store.

FELICITY:

Yeah. Yeah, I agree. I think there's a lot to be said for that. I think it's also undervalued by a lot of people. I actually did have a bike shop for three years, so I know what it's like. It's a hard grind. Yeah. You rock up every day with the best intention of serving your clients, and yeah, you make the time and put the effort into training, and yeah, it's nice to be rewarded for that by appreciation, really. I used to really love it when my clients would come to our Ergo classes or things like that. It was fun. They turned into friends. So yeah, it was really good. Yeah.

So you've raised $11,400, Cameron, for Ride the Long White Cloud, the CanTeen charity ride, and rode the entire length of New Zealand midwinter, which I was a bit gob smacked at, since we're the first month into winter at the moment. It was a great video, by the way. What prompted you to do that?

CAMERON:

Would you believe traffic and SEO?

FELICITY:

Great motivator.

CAMERON:

Yeah. Yeah. Look it was, we were shifting our focus at Bike Chaser after we sort of brought some bike shops on board and got some products up to, "Okay, how do we elevate our site? How do we make sure we get more traffic?" In the website or content world, there's something called content assets. A content asset is something that is other websites and other publishing sites will pick up and maybe point to. If you can get links from a number of powerful websites to your website, you can really elevate the strength of your website. I don't know if you know much about domain authority, but it's a score out of a hundred and every website has a domain authority. Google and Facebook have a hundred, so they're number one. Some of the really powerful cycling websites that you would know of would be around between 40 and 50 domain authority. We, at the time, had a domain authority of I think around 11 or 12. It's now over 30, so we're really on the up. But a lot of the power you can get from your domain authority is through quality links.

It's a bit unusual. That's how the motivation came about, because I had a husband and wife holiday planned in the middle of winter to New Zealand. This was like three years prior, where I had my kids organised and everything. I said to my wife, it was seven or eight weeks out, I said, "Oh, look, what are your thoughts on me riding the length of New Zealand? We could get a videographer. He could film it. We could create a content asset for Bike Chaser." She's very spontaneous, so she said, "Yep, let's do it. I can drive. It'll be a bit of fun."

Wasn't as much fun as she thought it was going to be. I think I averaged about 180 Ks a day. That included half-day ferrying, include one day I could only ride 30 or 40 Ks because I got attacked by a farm dog on day two. I didn't actually get bitten, but I tried to kick him away and I was cleated, and I really aggravated my knee quite badly. If you go to our website, you look at the big article, there's a picture of when I got cupped. I looked like an octopus leg. And there was horrendous rain. I got hailed on. I rode through like the black ice, which is icy roads. I came off my bike. It was hardcore extreme.

It's funny, my original motivation going into it, really now I reflect on it, I don't see it as something we did for content or SEO at all, like obviously, it was good for that but it was more just a quite an incredible personal experience because my mum's also from New Zealand. I'd been back there a fair bit, so it was an opportunity to connect with my motherland whilst it was extreme conditions, it was like completely present in the moment, full survival mode. So yeah, it was really an experience I'll never forget.

FELICITY:

That sounds amazing. And yeah, definitely, you wouldn't forget that experience, for sure. I didn't see the dog, so yeah.

CAMERON:

The videographer followed me for four and a half out of the 13 days, and then put that package together. He wasn't with me..

FELICITY:

In that part.

CAMERON:

..on that part. Yeah. He wasn't with me on the part where I fell down, and yeah. People always ask me, "Why did you do it in winter?" It just happened to be time that I had two weeks. It all fell together. It just happened to be in winter. So that's why it was in winter.

FELICITY:

If you could convey a message to our listeners, what would that be? Since you're a cyclist and you're covering every aspect of cycling with your platform, is there any bit of advice that you could or a message that you'd like to convey?

CAMERON:

Tell me more about what your listeners would be interested in. Now that you know more about the background of Bike Chaser and what we're doing, where do you think their interests would lie?

FELICITY:

Well, our listeners I consider are passionate like you and I. They love riding. They're regular riders. They love pretty much everything cycling. They travel. Some go over to the Tour de France alternate years, or you know, not all the time, but at different holiday periods. So yeah, just wondering what..

CAMERON:

That fits me, because I'm one of your listeners now. I've already listened to a couple of your podcasts.

FELICITY:

Great.

CAMERON:

So we're all in the same boat.

FELICITY:

That's right.

CAMERON:

Look, I think for me, what I've recognised and this is just in recent times, because sometimes you sort of question what you're doing with everything. Above everything, I'm not a massive fan of the sport of cycling, like Tour de France and like I watch the Tour de France, but I don't get into all the riders and the teams. If Richie Porte's doing well, that's awesome, and I'll be glued to the TV. Same with when Cadel won. I watch the Tour de France, I'll go to the Tour Down Under, but that's about it. What I'm super passionate about and what I love, is just the activity of bike riding.

I remember in, couple years ago, because I used to race in an amateur team, I really just overdid it in terms of training and doing events and stuff like that. I had the whole winter off the bike. I just said, "Right, it's winter. I've done eight months of solid training. I've just had enough." Whilst I did other activities like running and going to the gym and stuff like that and kept my fitness up, I got to the end of that three-month period stressed and anxious. I couldn't quite figure it all out. Then I started bike riding again.

What I recognised by that process and what keeps me, literally this afternoon, I'm going to go for a ride with a mate because just going out there in the fresh air. I find as soon as you exercise more than an hour, that's when you get the clarity. That's when you really sort of let go of your thoughts and it's really quite meditative. So just the mental health and the physical health and the friendship health side of this activity of cycling. I know that sounds obvious when you say it out loud, but it's something that I didn't really put much value to until I really sat back and thought about it and had some time off the bike. I don't know. I'm probably validating what all your listeners already know. But I think that's the approach that I take and the thought process I take towards cycling these days.

FELICITY:

I think we only know it if we've thought about it perhaps. Maybe if you've done it often enough, I certainly definitely relate to what you're saying. It certainly clears the fog for me, clears lots of thoughts. It's just a great relaxation, as well as energy release. Like a whole lot of things, as you say, it covers many aspects, I think, mentally, physically. You get more into diet, I think, when you're really into exercise as well. Food's always, it's rewarding as well because you can have treats, perhaps. So no, really covers a lot of bases. Yeah. So thank you for sharing that with us.

CAMERON:

No, no worries. Look, just to add one more layer. I remember going to the Australian Bicycle Summit in Brisbane last year. It was in May. They had American guy, can't remember his name. He's the head of the one big bicycling association over there. I think I said at the start of this discussion, he said and he said it multiple times in his speech, that cycling is really a simple solution to some of the world's most complex problems. The three things that he said were your physical health, your mental health, and inner-city congestion.

FELICITY:

Absolutely.

CAMERON:

The reason why they push that in the U.S., and its similar here, is because the funding towards the activity of cycling bike lanes and promoting it is really low, in comparison to what they invest into building new infrastructure like building new hospitals to manage the health issues, building new roads to manage the inner-city congestion, all this kind of stuff. It's a good message to be thinking about, I think.

FELICITY:

Definitely. I went to the summit this year, actually. There was a speaker from Vancouver. Vancouver's really similar to Sydney, but they're probably 20 or 30 years ahead of us. Their Mayor actually said that they're not paying any more for infrastructure, so they had to look at alternate ways of managing the congestion in the city. So they are actually investing in bike lanes and redirecting certain, actually, road user lanes or car user lanes so that it's filtered, so they get a lot more and they're actually terming it as active travel now, so that it's..

Because cyclists on our own, we can be perceived as we'll just say good or bad, but active travel is more comprehensive and more an umbrella of the future of travel, you know, so that it encompasses using buses, using trains, and using bikes, because quite often people will ride to a train station and then go to work, let's say, or ride to school or ride. We use cycling or bikes in a number of different formats, depending on who it is and at what stage of life you're at and what your preference or choice is, but it's a more holistic approach. I thought that was a really good distinction, and that we should be looking at that way forward, you know, because of our congestion is horrendous in Melbourne and Sydney in particular.

CAMERON:

Yeah, hundred percent. No, that is interesting. I like that type of approach where just like, "All right, we're not spending any more on infrastructure, so just got to look for different ways."

FELICITY:

That's right. Yeah. It's a pretty bold stand, you know? And good on him. Kudos to him. And they're getting the results. They measure everything, and it's working. So that's fantastic.

CAMERON:

Yeah.

FELICITY:

For our listeners today, I'd like to thank you for your time today, Cameron. It's been lovely chatting with you and learning more about your Bike Chaser platform. I'd like to ask our listeners to go and check your site out either on Twitter and Insta, you're bike_chaser, and YouTube and Facebook are @BikeChaser. So yeah, feel free to go and check out the Bike Chaser website and also support your local bike shop and ask them to join Bike Chaser. And then hopefully, we'll see some more people signing up. I look forward to your success, you know, following you into greater success.

CAMERON:

Yes. No, thanks very much for having me. Actually, as we've just been speaking, we've just signed up another bike store. Literally in the last hour. We're now at 89.

FELICITY:

Woohoo.

CAMERON:

Yeah. Yeah. Definitely tell the local bike store we have very, very good intentions around supporting them, and also connecting the local consumer with them. So thank you for that.

FELICITY:

Definitely. Shall do. Thank you, Cameron.

CAMERON:

Cheers.

FELICITY:

Bye-bye.

Thanks for listening to the All Torque podcast. We'd love it if you would leave us a rating and review on iTunes. This helps us to deliver content you want to hear about. Please take a moment to share it with your friends and family on Instagram and Facebook. I'm Felicity Dales, see you next episode for another story of inspiration and motivation on the All Torque podcast.

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